Visionary Intelligence Tertiary Mental Body Expression

(formerly known as Priest, Self-Referencing or Ray 6)

Known for being enthusiastic and cheerleading others. As a Visionary Mental Body Intelligence, our way to create safety is to have faith in something bigger than ourselves. We learn to respond to others with intuitive insights and understanding of their circumstances without even accepting our own. Our need to sacrifice ourselves for some bigger purpose teaches us to grow and adapt, even if we do not seem ready for it. The gift is that this forces us to focus on our personal experience and hold all others’ experience at bay. We absolutely believe that goodness will prevail, even if, so far, it has not.

Visionary on the Mental Body level creates a sense of safety by limiting all those things in our life where we do not have a sense of power or fluidity to personally make a contribution. Anything which seems like a good idea, gets lost in the need to make it personally relevant to our experience. The problem with this approach is that we can become very narrow and sectarian, particularly when we do not have a diversity of experience in our life. The more we define ourselves in a religious or theologically structured way, the more we naturally reinforce the experiences we have over those we do not. This means we tend to grow to fulfill the expectations of those around us and not necessarily take our self and our larger needs fully into account. It is interesting to note that being introduced to new topics sometimes is like a new doorway opening or a new light being shown in our life. This is because we have a tendency to limit our thinking to those areas, which we have internally accepted.

Energetically, we focus on driving forward into our experience, so that we take ownership of it, not as an abstract perception, but as something we inherently know. Due to this, Emotions are our Investigator component at 40%. Strong Feelings at 20%, combining with Emotions, empower our Intuition to guide us with another 20%. Finally, Visionaries use Thoughts to stay grounded and reflect back our knowing at 20%. What is missing is our ability to be connected to our body knowing (similar to the situation with Investigative Intelligence) which is why we need to work on grounding ourselves as much as possible.

Our strength comes from sensing a greater possibility and being able to guide others to it despite adversity. The key is to find the balance between our Thoughts and Emotions, where neither one is in charge. If we deny our Thoughts, we lose our connection to Light and Wisdom. If we deny our Emotions, we cut ourselves off from our inspiration and passion. Both are needed to effectively ground ourselves in our body. We instinctively protect ourselves by denying the perceptions of others particularly about our Emotions and Thoughts. If we cut ourselves off from our Thoughts and Emotions, we retreat into a world of superstition and fear where we think we know what is happening, but we are constantly proving that we do not.

We are unrelenting, idealistic, and unwilling to compromise. We do not give up and do not give in, which allows us to hold on to possibilities and work on manifesting them despite the odds. Instead, we slowly build undeniable associations (about and between what works) that we test by projecting them in the world. What we seek is a reaction from others that can then be directed to serve a new vision. We always seek to push the envelope by making things better. We expand or explode imbalances and obstructions in Content (similarly to Compassionate Intelligence), releasing Wisdom and Light. For the last 2000 years, our Visionary mentality has been completely in ascendance in trying to bring about more positive manifestations of action in the world. We have a rapid, straight-line motion, which attempts to capture the indefinable or inexpressible and put it in our pocket. When we dwell on our own experience, we are completely accurate and effective, but totally capable of gross distortion when dealing with passions of which we have little or no knowledge. We take pieces of what we know and apply the patterns to the world, but find that the world does not respond easily to our suggestions.

Visionary Mental Body individuals use self-referencing qualities to insulate and isolate ourselves from our family patterns. We focus on only what we internally know to be true from our own experience. This means we seldom take in other people’s perceptions, especially when it conflicts with our own experience. The more we have unfettered access to our emotions and feelings, the more likely we have developed intuitive perceptions that go beyond the book learning of our schools and universities. If we are not developed in this area, we frequently get caught up in self-critical patterns where by denying an aspect of ourselves we feel compelled to make it a goal of others. This self -righteous indignation puts others on alert that certain statements or behaviors are not acceptable around us. We also tend to judge individuals who are not as disciplined or committed to positive behaviors in their lives as we are in our life. The primary indicator of this Mental Body is a sense of discrimination in what is important and what is not. Unless we think it is a priority, we will not take it in or invest in developing new possibilities.

As a Visionary Mental Body, our way to create safety is to have faith in something bigger than ourselves. We learn to respond to others with intuitive insights and understanding of their circumstances without accepting our own. Our need to sacrifice ourselves for some bigger purpose teaches us to grow and adapt even if we do not seem ready for it. The gift is that this forces us to focus on our personal experience and hold all others’ experience at bay. Visionary on the mental body level creates a sense of safety by limiting those things in our lives where we do not have a sense of power or fluidity. Anything which seems like a good idea, gets lost in the need to make it personally relevant to our experience. The problem with this approach is that we can become very narrow and sectarian, particularly when we do not have a diversity of experience. The more we define ourselves in a religious or theologically structured way, the more we naturally reinforce the experiences we have over those we do not. This means we tend to grow to fulfill the expectations of those around us and not necessarily take our self and our larger needs fully into account. Being introduced to a new topic may be like a new doorway opening or a new light being shown in our life because we have a tendency to limit our thinking to those areas that we have internally accepted.

We are unrelenting, idealistic, and unwilling to compromise. We do not give up and do not give in, which allows us to hold on to possibilities and work on manifesting them despite the odds. Instead, we slowly build undeniable associations (about and between what works) that we test by projecting them in the world. What we seek is a reaction from others that can then be directed to serve a new vision. We always seek to push the envelope by making things better. When we dwell on our own experience, we are completely accurate and effective, but capable of gross distortion when dealing with passions of which we have little or no knowledge. We take pieces of what we know and apply the patterns to the world, but find that the world does not respond easily to our suggestions.

We are brilliant when it comes to our internal experience, but lack a clear understanding of how things work external to us, causing a more out of balance effect the further afield we go. We use a clear set of personal experiences to guide our choices that slowly change as we become more aware about energetic differences in the world. The more open we become to ambiguity the less force is needed to initiate growth in the thinking of others. We are shifting from a superficial over-masculine to a more authentic feminine framework. Full of goodness, big-pictured and without the desire to get into the details, we appreciate abstractions that allow us to summarize and synthesize concepts for others. We have a reputation for being one-pointed, repetitive and inflexible thinkers. It is this one-pointed-ness in our mental process that makes others cringe and challenge our point of view.

We tend to internalize our experience so we can see opportunities to transform the experience of others (particularly if that person can see our vision). Everything therefore becomes how to make the transition from an internal framework to an external manifestation of our unity. Our safety is defined by how much we are seen and honored in our independent view of reality. We want others to respect our independence and appreciate our focus, beginning with clean motivations. Anyone who denies the power of love to improve the world or discounts how good intentions and deeds can bring about transformative experiences had better avoid a person with our Mental Body. These things make us feel unsafe. Since we trust intuition with the support of faith and guidance, anyone who denies or discounts inner knowing over outer proof we see as suspect. We also find it difficult to be around overly materialistic individuals who are fixated on the (outer) appearance of things at the cost of inner development and spirit.

While we admire love, we do not trust conditional forms of love and frequently find ourselves trapped in an attempt to prove that we love others when in fact it is an idealization pattern. This means we tend to view love in terms of how much effort others are spending to connect with us rather than focusing on how much we can do to connect to the love within us. Since the source of love is our ability to love ourselves, the more we accept who we are as we are the more effectively we can live up to the ideal of love as existing everywhere around us. We also tend to seek individuals who need us so there is something we contribute to them that helps us build our self esteem and self respect. We want partners who can see our greater purpose and intentions and not get caught up in our self-deprecating patterns where we can become self-critical and self-judgmental.

Because we are not comfortable with our sensations and feelings we tend to define ourselves by how others want us physically, not realizing that this only amplifies our inner pain. The more we have experiences with others where we are not embodying our experience the more we seek traumatic experiences that increase our internal sense of disconnection. We need to break through this log jam by confronting our programmatic attempts to be safe because these experiences are the ones that will hurt us the most. Instead, we need to learn to choose others in a non-instinctive way that is initially discomforting but ultimately, consciousness raising in its effects. This is the best way to unpack the trauma that initially we denied within ourselves.

Attachments to particular principles, loyalties or creeds can also get in the way of our growth. We get comforted by repeating our internal mantras about what we believe, as a way of screening out anything that threatens or challenges us. This includes attachments to groups or people that make us feel safe. We fear to stand out or be made an example to others. Too often, we may have been ridiculed or made fun of because of our differences growing up. The key is not to get caught up in black and white dictums about how things should be. This attachment to a certain belief system minimizes our evolution and keeps us from examining and uplifting our own self-understanding. The key thing to remember is that we need to grow to be happy. Any fixation on an outer form or circumstance may create the illusion of safety but usually prevents us from questioning and clarifying what we know. If we are not willing to grow, the obvious result is a narrowing of our vision which traps us in a world where we constantly beat ourselves down because we are afraid of thinking big. The result is a narrowing of vision and the birth of fanaticism.

We tend to seek feedback in very incremental and limited ways. We over protect whatever we consider critical (particularly our desires) and hide them so no one can use them hurt us. We attempt to build our understanding piece by piece, and want to limit feedback until the past input has been digested. Our smaller focus leads others to believe we are not sufficiently analytical or logical. Because we resist analyzing the big picture, we are sometimes accused of not being able to adapt quickly or reorient ourselves to what is occurring. What we do best is dissect an idea or concept to find its underlying motive or insight. Others react to how volatile our internal creative process is and how little of our process we can share.

We are naturally idealistic and organize options in terms of their benefit and likely outcome within the scope of our intentions. Many consider us overly abstract and principled. Actually, we are not only organized by what we consider high-minded outcomes, but see ourselves as doers, pursuing solutions until we can create the tangible results we seek.

The way we protect ourselves is to ignore anything that does not feel true and right. We try to be the best we can be and ignore the rest. Most of the time, we try to remember what we are devoted to and what we have faith in. However, many times we fall into selfish and jealous love, dependency, gullibility and hyper-intensity when things do not seem to be going right. We can even suppress our instinctive sexual nature if we think it is not for the best. We are about pursuing the right or best thing no matter what the consequences. We minimize any form of emotional expression trying to live a pure and thoughtful life because so many difficulties arise based on feelings and emotions. The goal seems to be to give up or suppress that which seems troublesome. This can lead to self-abasement as a way of regaining our purity, masochism as a way of punishing ourselves and a martyr complex as a way of trying to attain a saintly state. The problem is that all of these aspects deny our humanity and need to make mistakes in order to grow. It also points out to us that the more we repress ourselves in the pursuit of something better, the less likely we are to attain it. What we need to do is to re-examine our choices and reconsider our loyalties based on that, which would assist our growth.

We are brilliant when it comes to our internal experience, but we lack a clear understanding of how things work external to us, causing a more out of balance effect the further a field we go. We use a clear set of personal experiences to guide our choices that slowly change as we become more aware about energetic differences in the world. The more open we become to ambiguity the less force is needed to initiate growth in the thinking of others. This reflects we are shifting from a superficial over-masculine to a more authentic feminine framework. Full of goodness, big-pictured and without the desire to get into the details, we appreciate abstractions that allow us to summarize and synthesize concepts for others. We have a reputation for being one-pointed, repetitive and inflexible thinkers. It is this one-pointed-ness in our mental process that makes others cringe and challenge our point of view.

As individuals with a Tertiary Visionary Intelligence, we tend to internalize our experience so we can see opportunities to transform the experience of others (particularly if that person can see our vision). Everything therefore becomes how to make the transition from an internal framework to an external manifestation of our unity. Our safety is defined by how much we are seen and honored in our independent view of reality. We want others to respect our independence and appreciate our focus, beginning with clean motivations. Anyone who denies the power of love to improve the world or discounts how good intentions and deeds can bring about transformative experiences had better avoid a person with our Tertiary Intelligence. These things make us feel unsafe. Since we trust Intuition with the support of faith and guidance, anyone who denies or discounts inner knowing over outer proof we see as suspect. We also find it difficult to be around overly materialistic individuals who are fixated on the (outer) appearance of things at the cost of inner development and spirit.

While we admire love, we do not trust conditional forms of love and frequently find ourselves trapped in an attempt to prove that we love others when in fact it is an idealization pattern. This means that we tend to view love in terms of how much effort others are spending to connect with us rather than focusing on how much we can do to connect to the love within us. Since the source of love is our ability to love ourselves, the more we accept who we are as we are the more effectively we can live up to the ideal of love as existing everywhere around us. We also tend to seek individuals who need us so there is something we contribute to them that helps us to build our self esteem and self respect. It is for this reason that we want partners who can see our greater purpose and intentions and not get caught up in self-deprecating patterns where we can become self-critical and self-judgmental.

Anyone who denies the power of Intuition for scientific or more concrete ways of understanding is seen as less conscious or unevolved. This reflects our attachment to Intuition as a process of honoring our own life energy. It is interesting to note that frequently we have biases that reflect our attachments to our own emotional well being. When we honor our Emotions as a tool to bring together our Thoughts we transcend the sentimental attachments we have to the shortcuts we adopt. In effect, we become more open to seeing how things work out on a larger level. Unfortunately, before we embrace the larger possibility, there are a lot of ways we try to honor our life energy which have the adverse effect of diminishing it. One of the primary ways is how we seek out excitement when, in fact, excitement is an indication that we are with a person that reflects the most difficult aspects of our parents. We seek out excitement when we do not have a good connection to our Feelings and Sensations. It indicates that we have instinctive life energy repression and we are trying to get some relief by being with individuals that provoke extreme experiences of fear overlapped with the possibility of correcting some past imbalance.

In this last example what we do not realize is that by repressing our own Sensations and Feelings we are in fact denying our embodied experience. As a result, we look to others to break up our inner denial by catalyzing our response to them. Because we are not comfortable with our Sensations and Feelings we tend to define ourselves by how others want us physically, not realizing that this only amplifies our inner pain. In effect, the more we have experiences with others where we are not embodying our experiences the more we seek out traumatic experiences that increase our internal sense of disconnection. Our Visionary Tertiary Intelligence needs to break through this log jam by confronting our programmatic attempts to be safe because these experiences are the ones that will hurt us the most. Instead, we need to learn to choose others in a non-instinctive way that are initially discomforting but ultimately, consciousness-raising in their effects. This is the best way to unpack the trauma that initially we denied within ourselves.

Attachments to particular principles, loyalties or creeds can also get in the way of our growth. A lot of times we get comforted by repeating our internal mantras about what we believe as a way of screening out anything that threatens or challenges us. This includes attachments to groups or people that make us feel safe. This process reflects the fear that we do not want to stand out or be made an example to others. Too often, we may have been ridiculed or made fun of because of our differences growing up. The key is not to get caught up in black and white dictums about how things should be. This attachment to a certain belief system minimizes our evolution and keeps us from examining and uplifting our own self-understanding. The key thing to remember is that we need to grow to be happy.

Any fixation on an outer form or circumstance may create the illusion of safety but usually prevents us from questioning and clarifying what we know. If we are not willing to grow, the obvious result is a narrowing of our vision that traps us in a world where we constantly beat ourselves down because we are afraid of thinking big. The result is a narrowing of vision and the birth of fanaticism.

Our Visionary Mental Body Intelligence tends to seek feedback in very incremental and limited ways. We over protect whatever we consider critical (particularly our desires) and hide them so that no one can hurt us easily. We attempt to build our understanding piece by piece, which is why we want to limit feedback until the past input has been digested. Our smaller focus leads other Intelligences to believe we are not sufficiently analytical or logical. Because we resist analyzing the big picture, we are sometimes accused (by other Intelligences) of not being able to adapt quickly or reorient ourselves to what is occurring. What we do best is dissect an idea or concept to find its underlying motive or insight. Others react to how volatile our internal creative process is and how little of our process we can share. Our Intelligence is distinguished by our mental ardor, devotion, and desire for manifesting solutions that contribute to the world.

While we are (eventually) considered completely intuitive, initially (since it is not easily quantifiable or predictive) others may see us as non-linear and non-rational in nature. We have a very narrow focus on how we grow and achieve our goals. This mental vision embraces the whole picture, but may not include all the aspects necessary to actually manifest its vision. This is why so many of us find ourselves categorized as ethereal or hard to pin down, even though we are quite clear about what we are committed to. Another gift of the Visionary Tertiary is that we are passionately clear and direct about what we believe, so much so that we become confused if others do not articulate their views in a similar way. This can lead to bouts of pessimism and hopelessness when we become frustrated by the inability of others to work with us.

The will of the Visionary is almost the same as the Orchestrating Intelligence. The main difference is that Visionary Intelligence is not so much interested in operational thinking, but in completing a thought process in a way that leaves a clear, uplifting imprint for others to follow. The other difference is that Visionary Intelligence is actually the feminine perspective, while the Orchestrating is masculine. We lay the mental track for others to follow. Our ability to be brief and to the point makes us seem like Orchestrating Intelligence, but what differentiates us is the capacity to endlessly repeat and reinforce ourselves, which makes it difficult to change direction once a path is chosen. We are naturally idealistic and organize options in terms of our benefit and likely outcome within the scope of our intentions. Many consider us to be overly abstract and principled. Actually, we are not only organized by what we consider high-minded outcomes, but we see ourselves as doers, pursuing solutions until we can create the tangible results we seek.

We are naturally idealistic and organize options in terms of their benefit and likely outcome within the scope of our intentions. Many consider us overly abstract and principled. Actually, we are not only organized by what we consider high-minded outcomes, but we see ourselves as doers, pursuing solutions until we can create the tangible results they seek.

Our Visionary type of Intelligence goes through three stages of development. We emphasize our physical Aliveness and capacity to manifest what we desire. This expression is focused primarily on Intent and how this intent matches the results we produce. Getting past this stage requires the ability to go beyond tried and true mental approaches that repeat old patterns. Until we escape this conservative mindset of repeating the past, we cannot really begin to engage our creative capacity.

The second level of development is where the blinding light of our eyes shows forth, which shows where we are beginning to use Thoughts to awaken the knowing of others. This indicates that we have come to a single-mindedness of purpose that can be focused on others. This is a personality-based, security-conscious belief in our rightness. (Unless we come to understand the downside of confronting and putting others on the defensive, which reduces our effectiveness, we do not evolve beyond this stage.) Our need to identify with our Thoughts and take credit for how we push things forward interferes with our natural desire to operate freely with others.

By practicing restraint, the third level emerges, which is where we start seeing the wholeness of ourselves as part of the group and begin to unify others through emotional perceptivity. The transpersonal power of the group calls forth the Intelligence needed to solve the group’s problems. In this way, we find our full blossoming in helping to anchor the reality of others as to what the group knows and wishes to accomplish together. We develop more concretely in terms of Thoughts and then slowly expand to body Sensations and Emotions. We are naturally Convergent and doggedly incremental in our decision-making style.

The way we protect ourselves when we have Visionary Mental Body Intelligence is to ignore anything that does not feel true and right. This means we try to be the best we can be and ignore the rest. Most of the time, we try to remember what we are devoted to and what we have faith in. Many times we fall into selfish and jealous love, dependency, gullibility and hyper-intensity when things do not seem to going right. We can even suppress our instinctive sexual nature if we think it is not for the best. The Visionary Intelligence on the Mental Body is about pursuing the right or best thing no matter what the consequences. It minimizes any form of emotional expression trying to live a pure and thoughtful life.

This is because so many difficulties arise based on Feelings and Emotions. The goal seems to be to give up or suppress that which seems troublesome. This can lead to self-abasement as a way of regaining our purity, masochism as a way of punishing ourselves and a martyr complex as a way of trying to attain a saintly state. The problem is that all of these aspects deny our humanity and need to make mistakes in order to grow. It also points out to us that the more we repress ourselves in the pursuit of something better, the less likely we are to attain it. What we need to do is to re-examine our choices and reconsider our loyalties based on that, which would assist our growth.

As parents, we focus on the motivation our children have to engage life. We believe that if they have the best motivations, everything will work out. Unfortunately, this orientation is not always one that children can understand. While we believe that devotion, charity, and humility are great characteristics for children to embody, many children cannot or will not live up to these possibilities. The main distinction is that a Visionary Mental Body parent's focus on the experience of love and how we show compassion. Orchestrating, Investigative, Intentional and Patterning Intelligence Mental Body children will not respond to this approach, because they will need to express their will in ways that are motivationally limited and learn from their mistakes. Only children with Compassionate, Inventive and Visionary Intelligence Mental Bodies will easily respond to a motivational calibration process that we, as parents, hold dear. We want our children to develop their passion and bliss and higher motivation seems to be the best way to get there. Other children need to start with the lowest motives and work their way up so they can experience problems. The issue is that we can feel like failures, because we did not teach our child to avoid these negative expressions. This difference in viewpoint can cause great schisms between the child and us, as parents.

When we operate from this Mental Body we focus on the motivation our children have with which to engage life. We believe that if they have the best motivations, everything will work out. Unfortunately, this orientation is not always one children can understand. While we believe devotion, charity, and humility are great characteristics for children to embody, many children cannot or will not live up to these possibilities. It is important to remember that children need to be children and that any imposition of expectations upon them can have either a positive or negative effect. What we want to accomplish as parents is to recognize what the child’s need is for structure and provide it to the degree that they need it. The main distinction is that Visionary Mental Body parents focus on the experience of passion and believe they alone possess the key insights necessary to empower their child’s growth. While this can be true, it is also self limiting to not allow other teachers or authority figures contribute to the child in the same way the parent does. What the children learn is how to meet the expectations of their parents and not question their commands in front of others. Sometimes this expands into “Children are to be seen and not heard”. The core issue is that a child learns to pay attention to what their mother says and do it without argument.

It is this Mental Body that is most commonly adopted in the United States as the model for “parental goodness”. The core intention is that we want our children to perform to the best of their ability and are unwilling to have them do anything less. A part of how this is accomplished is the parent’s constant belief that the child can do anything. This exaggerated sense of possibilities is picked up by the child and is the largest cause of children not possessing a realistic understanding of what they are getting into. In surveys among children, comparing their expectations to their actual grades only in the United States are children who are performing poorly do they have the expectations that they can easily catch up and succeed. This over confidence is particularly scary in areas of Math and Science where we as a country have been under performing for some time. Orchestrator, Implementer, Investigator and Storyteller children will not respond to this approach, because they will need to express their will in ways that are motivationally limited and learn from their mistakes. Only children with Compassionate, Inventive and Visionary Intelligence will respond to a motivational process that we, as parents, hold dear.

We want our children to develop their passion and bliss, higher motivation seems to be the best way to get there. Other children need to start with the lowest motives and work their way up to experience how to take problems and turn them into possibilities. The issue is that we can feel like failures, because we did not teach our child to avoid these negative expressions. This difference in viewpoint can cause great schisms between the child and us, as parents. Other problems occur between the child’s and the parent’s expectations. When they are vastly different, it usually leads to these types of parents attempting to force their views upon the child. This usually occurs by limiting how a child spends his time and forcing him to do what is expected. This approach works best for Visionary children. It is problematic for Inventor, Storyteller and Implementer children. While Compassionate children go along with this process, later in life they need to recover the power to chose for themselves what is appropriate.

Page Author: 
© Copyright 2016, Larry Byram. All Rights Reserved.

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