Orchestrating Intelligence Tertiary Mental Body Expression

(formerly known as King, Intrapersonal or Ray 1)

Known as a protector of others. As Mental Body Orchestrating Intelligences, or Orchestrators, there is a fear that we need to prove ourselves strong and independent or die. Our need to prove our independence and power can startle others, because they are not as prepared as we are to engage life. We take advantage of their lack of preparation to be adventurous and clear about intentions. As long as we maintain the initiative, our life proceeds easily. It teaches us to be able to anticipate what is needed before others do. It teaches us to think on our feet and let others ask for what they need, rather than volunteering anything. Over time, we seek to be gracious to those who look after our interests and support our well-being. In this way, we build a cadre of friends, business associates and partners in many projects.  Our initiative frequently works out, because we have an innate capacity to determine what we want and what we need to obtain to move things forward. 

Energetically, intellectual Thoughts comprise 60% of our energy, while Sensations and Emotions are 30% and 10%, respectively. This means we are primarily using clarity of deduction with some degree of body resonance to formulate our perceptions.  Our strength comes from being able to experience our truth in advance of doing something. To the small degree we use our Emotions, they help us to integrate and bring together our body and mind into one focused experience. When we cut ourselves off from others, our isolation becomes the barren anger, which drives us to torment others. If we have lost our sense of compassion for others, we can only recover our balance by melting our anger. The heat of our Emotions warms up the frigidity of our Thoughts, which is grounded by our Sensations, which we hold dear. We instinctively protect our self through bravado and when this does not work, we make others regret the day they were born. There is nothing we will not do to make others uncomfortable, if they attempt to abuse us.

We are identified by our firmness of thought and opinion. Our confidence in engaging issues is fortified by both study, as well as our ability to observe and predict the behavior of others. Our mind functions in terms of principles, which act as a synthesizing agent to address problems. Fundamentally, we know that the way we define a problem establishes the solution to it. Therefore, we rarely let others define problems in their own terms. The key quality is that we see the underlying structure of circumstances and know which pieces are essential and those that are not. This is why some people see us as a strategic, integrative thinker, who grows through centralizing and deepening any particular application. We can also be identified by our decisiveness, which by its nature is dominating and impressive in its capacity to formulate a unique solution. 

Another quality is our capacity to immediately see what is not working, which is often expressed in critical or condescending ways. The qualities of mental endurance and independence of thought also reflect this detached, impersonal way of coming to conclusions after considerable effort. In this process, every rational or logical solution is considered. At some point, a shift occurs where everything becomes clear and the solution reveals itself. While we are not outspoken in the fact gathering process, as soon as clarity is reached, we feel compelled to present our ideas, unblemished by any consideration for political correctness. Like those with the Intentional Intelligence, our communication is known for its brevity and straight to the point quality. The length of time a problem is engaged is usually directly related to the complexity of the problem being pursued. 

Once engaged, we Orchestrators, like Intentional Intelligence individuals, are incredibly persistent, convergent, and linear in our pursuit of Truth. Like the Visionary Intelligence, those of us with Orchestrating Intelligence arrive at our own conclusions without being influenced by others. Despite our lack of personal concern about people issues, we are in touch with the larger essence of a problem and want to solve it, taking into account what people as a whole need. Another giveaway for our Orchestrating thought process is the desire to break a problem down into orderly segments, which are sequentially considered. More than any other Creative Intelligence, this process contains a sense of reality with an urgent demand to address things as they are without being attached to any predetermined or predefined future. 

Our strength comes from being able to experience our truth in advance of doing something. To the small degree we use our emotions, they help us integrate and bring together our body and mind into one focused experience. When we cut ourselves off from others, our isolation becomes the barren anger that drives us to torment others. If we have lost our sense of compassion for others, we can only recover our balance by melting our anger. The heat of our emotions warms up the frigidity of our thoughts, which is grounded by the sensations, which we hold dear. We instinctively protect ourselves through bravado and when this does not work, we make others regret the day they were born. There is nothing we will not do to make others uncomfortable, if they attempt to abuse us.

We are identified by our firmness of thought and opinion. Our confidence in engaging issues is fortified by study, as well as our ability to observe and predict the behavior of others. Our mind functions in terms of principles, which act as a synthesizing agent to address problems. Fundamentally, we know the way we define a problem establishes the solution to it. Therefore, we rarely let others define problems in their own terms. We see the underlying structure of circumstances and know which pieces are essential and those that are not. This is why some people see us as strategic, integrative thinkers, who grow through centralizing and deepening in any particular application. We also can be identified by our decisiveness, which by its nature is dominating and impressive in its capacity to formulate a unique solution.

Another quality is our capacity to immediately see what is not working, which is often expressed in critical or condescending ways. The qualities of mental endurance and independence of thought also reflect this detached, impersonal way of coming to a conclusion after considerable effort. In this process, every rational or logical solution is considered. At some point, a shift occurs where everything becomes clear and the solution reveals itself. While we are not outspoken in the fact gathering process, as soon as clarity is reached, we feel compelled to present our ideas, unblemished by any consideration for political correctness. Our communication is known for its brevity and straight to the point quality. The length of time a problem is engaged is usually directly related to its’ complexity.

Despite our lack of personal concern about people issues, we are in touch with the larger essence of a problem and want to solve it, taking into account what people as a whole need. Another giveaway for an Orchestrator Mental Body is the desire to break a problem into orderly segments, which are sequentially considered. This process contains a sense of reality and an urgent demand to address things as they are without being attached to any predetermined or predefined future.

As an Orchestrator Mental Body we tend to define everything external to us and do not allow others in. Everything therefore becomes how to meet us in the way we wish to be met. Anyone who projects a victim mentality upon us will be shut down immediately. We tend to dislike those who will not speak up or represent themselves in a responsive manner. Those who are emotionally needy, sentimental or excessively reactive tend to be more work than we need or want to confront. Obsessive individuals who demand more energy than they are worth also repulse us. Since we sometimes suffer from egotism and excessive pride, anyone who does not acknowledge our power may be perceived as an adversary. Since anyone with ambition is easy to control, we support it. Anyone whose ambition is impossible to define becomes an unknown in the equation, which makes them unpredictable which upsets us. We also despise individuals with a lot of fear and self-pity. We seek to attract those at the top of their game who have a spark of originality and a willingness to dare to be great. Others without this commitment tend to frustrate and polarize us.

We tend to fall into physical distortions of our reality and accentuate our outer strength whenever challenged by others. For this reason, our image of strength and our sense of personal destiny cannot be challenged without feeling personally attacked. When this occurs, unconsciously we seek out others to confirm our power and prestige. Internally, we tend to emphasize our absolute right to manifest what we want the way we want it. In this way, we can end up creating a false persona to fit the image of being indestructible and unwavering in our belief about who we are. We do this because any sense of doubt or self -questioning can be perceived by others to be a weakness. Sometimes when we are threatened we can react by showing others just how destructive we can be. This puts others on notice because we demonstrate the reality that we would rather have no result than to have a compromised, mediocre result. Occasionally, we feel compelled to clear the decks so everyone can embrace a completely new solution. It has been our experience that when others have been deprived of a compromised solution they will be fully motivated to bring about the change we want to make.

We are concentrated and one-pointed [Zen: Do one thing at a time, and do it well] and we are able to make decisions on the fly with relative ease. We operate in a straight line, like an arrow seeking its target. We expand or explode into imbalances in Intent so that Life energy is free to manifest. We are called Orchestrators, because we integrate different perspectives within ourselves and then use this unified framework to set a course that others either respond or react to. We are clear-cut, hard-edged, and thorough in our in-depth appreciation of detail and can articulate and put together a large external picture. Metaphorically, we are the primary masculine energy of the Father.  For this reason, the masterful use of tools is what provides a sense of progress and fulfillment. Our Orchestrating Intelligence relates everything to the Self, so we can be considered self-centered, because others do not understand the unifying effect and benefit of our self-focus. This quality makes us decisive, and we can arrive at answers quickly with minimal interaction with others. We also have little regret or doubt. We protect our conclusions to the end, even though we may change them along the way. 

Since we engage will on a personal level, we have an unshakeable fixity of purpose. This self-focus also makes us very clear about what is relevant in particular situations. This means we focus on the key elements or principals driving a process and do not get bogged down in the details. We take our experience and synthetically project it in a way that can be seen as asserting itself on the world. We see what is needed and get to the core facts of the matter through a rigorous internal methodology that guarantees an answer in a minimal amount of time. We work by being the expansive Thought that moves forward. Often, we are seen as selfish, self-centered people, preoccupied with the principles being expressed. 

Once a decision is made, we mobilize all resources quickly towards our goal. Our minds hold a large, broad vision that initially, we leave open when considering a plan of engagement. We try to position a plan in a way that maximizes benefit and minimizes the ability of others to affect it. This upsets those who wish to be consulted before any action is contemplated. The appearance that Orchestrators are unwilling to share reflects our personal decision making process. We do not like opening our thinking process to others. This trait further amplifies the belief that we are hard to deal with. Common terms for understanding about how we unify various concepts do not exist, because, paradoxically, we integrate the positive and negative simultaneously. This, and our quick ability to move forward, distinguishes us from the Visionary Intelligence thinker. 

We accomplish this with a brevity and economy of effort that frequently leaves people behind. Like the Investigative Intelligence, Orchestrating Intelligence uses the mental plane to integrate all other types of knowing. Orchestrating Intelligence is outspoken, unembellished in its communication, and willing to cut through all obstacles to fulfill personal goals. We are direct, unequivocal and committed to making our points in a way that breaks through preconceptions about a situation. Our unique power is to destroy the illusory by refusing to get caught up in Objectification and Subjectification. We do, however, get caught up in a bit of Idealization around our ability to see and anticipate potential obstacles. While capable of great convergence, we tend to fall into patterns of extreme discrimination, where we exclude rather than include. 

We do not like to rely either on people who, or information that cannot be verified. Like the Investigative Intelligence, we evaluate information sources based on the level of perceived bias. Unlike the Investigative Intelligence, we do bias our perception based on past experience, both positive and negative. This is because our evaluations are based on real world experience and not abstract detachment. We are committed to putting the full power of our minds on the line, compelling all Thoughts to serve the chosen goal. This has made us extremely successful on standardized tests. 

Our Orchestrating Intelligence reinforces and grounds the Investigative Intelligence; emphasized by Investigative Primary and Secondary Expressions. When the two are integrated, it greatly magnifies our effect in the world. The opposite is often true when we put the Orchestrating Intelligence with the Compassionate Intelligence. The emotional connection of the Compassionate Intelligence with the Orchestrating Intelligence, makes it easier to connect with them. Those with the Orchestrating Intelligence are more likely to centralize power in their intellectual (Subjectification) and physical (Objectification) frameworks before investing (at all) in the emotional feeling realm. The Orchestrating Intelligence is extremely sensitive to touch, especially when it relates to conveying a vibratory quality.

We can recognize the importance of our Orchestrating Intelligence by how we overdo, under-do, or react to it. When we overdo this Intelligence, we become dominating as we demonstrate the impressiveness of our thinking (by imposing it on others). When we under-do this Intelligence, we become reserved and unwilling to speak out in all but brief terms. When overwhelmed and/or discounted by individuals who do not accept this form of Intelligence (particularly if they are not willing to consider a larger, more integrated plan), we become extremely one-pointed and manifest our intellectual endurance in trenchant ways. It is interesting to note that while our Intelligence can be affirmative, it does not want to get lost in self-flattering delusions. When we are hurt, we become outspoken and isolating at the same time to protect ourselves. 

What people do not understand is that we see ourselves as changing the status quo. What we seek to eliminate is the irrational or illogical aspects of business that do not have long-term benefits. Sometimes this involves eliminating or changing the way people are hired. Others tend to believe our attempts to minimize the impacts of people as being hard and cruel because of our attention to structure and not paying for anything that does not go to the bottom line. Others tend to believe that we are controlling and suppress the good will of people because we are personally stuck up or inhibited. The truth is, we see our contribution as one that enhances predictability. If the human constraints of a project and the needs of the people are ascertained to be at a certain level, we do want to maintain our agreements. What drives us crazy are people who complain or moan that they deserve more or they will strike. This irritates us because it adds unpredictability to the bottom line. When we have commitments to other people and some smaller group has an adverse impact on the quality of the whole project, we do not believe that it is fair. Therefore, it is natural that we push back with everything we have. Being able to bring projects in under budget is also reinforced by a sense of impatience to drive the process forward. Our stubbornness can also be a good managerial quality because we want everything to come together in a particular way. 

As an individual with a Tertiary Orchestrating Intelligence, we tend to define everything external to us and do not allow others in. Everything therefore becomes how to meet our Intelligence in the way we wish to be met. Anyone who projects a victim mentality upon us will be shut down immediately. We tend to dislike those who will not speak up or represent themselves in a responsive manner. Those who are emotionally needy, sentimental or excessively reactive tend to be more work for our Intelligence than we need or want to confront. Obsessive individuals who demand more energy than they are worth also repulse us. Since we sometimes suffer from egotism and excessive pride, anyone who does not acknowledge our power may be perceived as an adversary. Since anyone with ambition is easy to control, we support it. Anyone whose ambition is impossible to define becomes an unknown in the equation, which makes them unpredictable which upsets us. We also despise individuals with a lot of fear and self-pity. We seek to attract those at the top of their game who have a spark of originality and a willingness to dare to be great. Others without this commitment tend to frustrate and polarize us.

We tend to fall into physical distortions of our reality and accentuate our outer strength whenever challenged by others. For this reason, our image of strength and our sense of personal destiny cannot be challenged without feeling personally attacked. When this occurs, unconsciously we seek out others to confirm our power and prestige. Internally, we tend to emphasize our absolute right to manifest what we want the way we want it. In this way, we can end up creating a false persona to fit the image of being indestructible and unwavering in our belief about who we are. We do this because any sense of doubt or self -questioning can be perceived by others to be a weakness. Sometimes when we are threatened we can react by showing others just how destructive we can be. This puts others on notice because we demonstrate the reality that we would rather have no result than to have a compromised, mediocre result. Occasionally, we feel compelled to clear the decks so that everyone can embrace a completely new solution. It has been our experience that when others have been deprived of a compromised solution that they will be fully motivated to bring about the change we want to make.

As a parent, we feel the need to support our children in discovering their own power to change their lives. While we want them to succeed, we also need them to understand that they need to sink or swim on their own. What affects us the most is timidity or lack of clarity of purpose. What we admire is our children taking charge, figuring out their options and possibilities. We can easily be enrolled in their plans when they state what they need and even negotiate with us. What they learn is that forthrightness can pay off. We also come to understand that confusion and delay result in considerable self-inflicted pain. We also appreciate when they can analyze the causes of their own failure and propose solutions for the situation. The more our children act in a courageous manner, the more we treat them as adults. If they contain and express a lot of emotion, we attempt to support them in channeling this power in friendships or in groups, or we personally do not encourage it. 

We are proud when they become able to manipulate their circumstances and define their own course of action. We also enjoy it when they become extremely active and passionate in their own personal causes or sports. This is because we believe competition will bring the best out in everyone. We reward academic performance as well as leadership in clubs or sports because we have a predisposition to physical activity. Any child who responds to our suggestions or who through intelligence, perseverance, and wit, finds a way to distinguish themselves from others, deserves our complete support.

We can easily be enrolled in our child’s plans when they state what they need and even negotiate with us. What they learn is that forthrightness can pay off. Our children come to understand that confusion and delay result in considerable self-inflicted pain. We also appreciate when they can analyze the causes of their own failure and propose solutions for the situation. The more our children act in a courageous manner, the more we treat them as adults. If they contain and express a lot of emotion, we attempt to support them in channeling this power into friendships or in groups, or we let them sink or swim on their own. This is because we don’t want our children to be overly emotional. We are proud when they are able to manipulate their circumstances and define their own course of action. We also enjoy it when they become extremely active and passionate in their own personal causes or sports. This is because we believe competition brings out the best in everyone. We reward academic performance as well as leadership in clubs or sports because we have a predisposition to physical activity.

Any child who responds to our suggestions or who through intelligence, perseverance, and wit, finds a way to distinguish themselves from others, deserves our complete support. On the other hand, if a child cannot define himself or distinguish himself in some way, we typically indicate our lack of approval by ignoring him to some degree. In this way we believe we reward self determination and convey our disdain for mediocrity. Children with Intentional, Investigative and even Patterning Intelligence can blossom in this environment, while those with Visionary, Compassionate and Inventive Intelligence will be more touch and go depending upon how much interaction we have with them at an early age. The key thing to remember is that the Orchestrator Mental Body expects to be listened to, to have our orders followed and to be respected, otherwise there are problems. This style is a naturally action oriented, big picture doer. It is second most masculine Mental Bodies and may not think it is appropriate to show too much affection with children.

Page Author: 
© Copyright 2016, Larry Byram. All Rights Reserved.

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