Mental Body Expression

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Introduction Tertiary Expression

Initially in this work the Mental Bodies were not believed to be critical in realizing our Creative Uniqueness and Compatibility in choosing better partners because our Mental Body Expression is internalized and usually hidden except in times of stress. Over time, it became clear that the relationship between the Mental Body, the Secondary and Primary was critical because the Mental Body can either facilitate the synthesis of the three, or become an obstacle that keeps the Creative Expressions separate. What we need to understand about the Mental Body Expression is that it is the first one we develop as an integral part of our personality. In describing children, we also talk about the Bioelectric Body and Sentient Body that are then integrated into the Mental Body when we become adults. The Mental Body describes how we create safety in our family of origin. It usually coincides with Creative Energies demonstrated by our parents so we do not collapse or become enmeshed in their idea of themselves. Many times the Mental Body also has Imprinting that is the same as our Mental Body Expression. This provides us with layers where we try to differentiate ourselves from our parents by not losing ourselves in their preconceptions.

Mental Body Expression can be described in terms of characteristics, beliefs and behavior that protect us from others who do not understand or accept us. It is important that we do not confuse these perspectives with our Secondary Creative Expression. The Secondary Creative Expression is about success and our creative path to differentiate ourselves from others by being powerful in our self-expression. The Secondary is primarily where we become conscious of ourselves, while the Mental Body still contains a lot of unconscious elements that have not been synthesized. It is primarily sub-conscious and instinctive and because of this, usually generates reactions when something does not go as expected. Some suggest that the Mental Body is our identity in terms of “me” while the Secondary is our identity in terms of “I”. As we grow up, our “me” becomes integrated in an “I” which is then transformed into a “we” when we become transpersonal.

We initially become defensive about our Mental Body when our parents do not reflect it back to us. The more we do not fit their idea of how we should think and respond, the more concerned they become about our safety and security. We interpret this as their not trusting us and resolve the dilemma in one of three ways. 1) we over-do our Mental Body in a particular way that pushes others to confront us, 2) we under-do and limit the expression of our Mental Body only to situations where others are receptive, and 3) we angrily withdraw and sporadically explode when we feel discounted and denied in the same way our parents treated us. This means we can identify our Mental Body, not just by how we express ourselves, but by the unique ways we deny our power.

We use our Mental Body to protect ourselves in our family. Some would say that our Mental Body provides an optimum way to distinguish ourselves from other family members. The key issue is to have a separate way of thinking about what is going on in the family versus adopting the thoughts of others that results in an enmeshed way of thinking. What we need to remember is that our Mental Body is how we create a sense of safety in ourselves. As children, we use our Mental Body to self reflect on what is going on in the family system. Each of the seven Mental Body Creative Expressions provides a way to protect and differentiate ourselves from others. As children we learn to hold ourselves back and keep others from overwhelming us by engaging in this manner of thinking. Orchestrator and Implementer Mental Body children protect themselves by taking action independent of others. Compassionate, Investigator and Visionary Mental Body children protect themselves by thinking in a more Content focused manner as to why people do what they do. Finally, Inventor and Storyteller Mental Body children focus themselves on their Intuitive sense of what it must mean to see certain activities in the family dynamic.

As it turns out, our Parenting Style is based on our Mental Body Expression. As adults, we shift to an outward projection of what our children need to be safe, based on what would have worked for us when we were children. Hence, the birth of Imprinting unless our children happen to be the same Creative Expressions as we are (which is rarely the situation).

Validating Our Mental Body Creative Expression

We can validate our Mental Body Creative Expression by looking at our childhood, our family members and realizing what we needed to do in order to feel safe. If we understand who are parents are in terms of their Creative Expressions, we can begin to re-write our childhood from the perspective of “everyone was doing their best”. For instance, if our parents had Investigator/Visionary/Inventor/Compassion expressions, we might choose an Inventor Mental Body so we could easily “go with the flow” in that situation. Or, we could choose a Visionary Mental Body so we could be strong and independent. If we are parents ourselves, we can validate our Mental Body Expression by how we initially parented our children. As parents, we tend to parent our children the way that would have worked for us - hence we revert to our Mental Body Expression. We continue to have the support of our Mental Body Expression throughout our lives. As adults, it could become our favorite way to relax and regenerate, especially if we are feeling overwhelmed and stressed (hence the need to feel “safe”). An Investigator Mental Body might like to read books to relax where an Inventor Mental Body might like to listen to music.

When working with children who have not actualized their Secondary or Primary expressions, we take into account an expanded set of creative factors that reflect Sentient Body and The Bio-Electric Bodies. The Sentient Body, which is the combination of our Emotions and Feelings, has seven options as well. The Bio-Electric Body, which is the combination of our Sensations and Feelings, has seven descriptions that reflect how these children ground their experience physically. With effective integration into the Mental Body, most adults do not need to determine these factors. We teach recognition of these factors in the children’s Inner Seeing course.

Our Mental Body Expression ultimately supports our Secondary to be successful which supports our Primary to be who we are meant to be. How do your Expressions support you?

How do you seek to be Safe:

a) Are you protective of others, outgoing, distinct and hard to influence? Do you have a robust Action component and a sense of motivation and direction?  (Orchestrator)
b) Do you pay attention to results, and not the means for getting there? Do you seek clarity of different points of view, before you engage others? (Implementer)
c) Are you easily caught up in the needs of others, and like to be the “peacemaker”? (Compassionate)
d) Do you become rebellious when disciplined or feel trapped by others’ assumptions? (Inventor)
e) Do you pay close attention to the ability of others so you can work out optimum ways to integrate people? (Investigator)
f) Do you often project your views onto others because it is the truth? Are you perfectionistic or fixated on the Truth when you feel repressed? (Visionary)
g) Do you like to work together with others to discover the best solutions? (Storyteller)

Appreciating Our Mental Body Creative Expression

Most individuals do not find it difficult to appreciate the contribution of the Secondary energy. Typically, we begin expressing our Secondary Creative Expression as early as our teenage years which is when we start our quest for independence. As a result of our childhood we have formed ideas as to what type of lifestyle we want for ourselves, according to our needs for Survival and Success. Our Secondary Expression is the means for achieving our goals, until such time as we are ready to express our Primary Creative Expression. As previously mentioned, due to our conditioning and defensiveness, most of us do not experience our Primary Creative Expression until we are at least 35 years old. The transition from “doing” our Secondary Expression to “being” our Primary Expression, can be painful. Our Secondary does not want to let go of control. We have doubts that we can even support ourselves by doing something different, or something we love. As we continue to move forward, we need to let go of our limiting stories and beliefs.

At some point, we can begin to appreciate the beauty of our design. We realize that our Secondary is perfectly suited to support how we truly want to be in the world as our Primary Creative Expression. All of our experiences in life, work, and relationships integrate so we are able to consciously direct our path with the support of the choices we have made in our past.

Orchestrating Intelligence Tertiary Mental Body Expression

(formerly known as King, Intrapersonal or Ray 1)

Known as a protector of others. As Mental Body Orchestrating Intelligences, or Orchestrators, there is a fear that we need to prove ourselves strong and independent or die. Our need to prove our independence and power can startle others, because they are not as prepared as we are to engage life. We take advantage of their lack of preparation to be adventurous and clear about intentions. As long as we maintain the initiative, our life proceeds easily. It teaches us to be able to anticipate what is needed before others do. It teaches us to think on our feet and let others ask for what they need, rather than volunteering anything. Over time, we seek to be gracious to those who look after our interests and support our well-being. In this way, we build a cadre of friends, business associates and partners in many projects.  Our initiative frequently works out, because we have an innate capacity to determine what we want and what we need to obtain to move things forward. 

Energetically, intellectual Thoughts comprise 60% of our energy, while Sensations and Emotions are 30% and 10%, respectively. This means we are primarily using clarity of deduction with some degree of body resonance to formulate our perceptions.  Our strength comes from being able to experience our truth in advance of doing something. To the small degree we use our Emotions, they help us to integrate and bring together our body and mind into one focused experience. When we cut ourselves off from others, our isolation becomes the barren anger, which drives us to torment others. If we have lost our sense of compassion for others, we can only recover our balance by melting our anger. The heat of our Emotions warms up the frigidity of our Thoughts, which is grounded by our Sensations, which we hold dear. We instinctively protect our self through bravado and when this does not work, we make others regret the day they were born. There is nothing we will not do to make others uncomfortable, if they attempt to abuse us.

We are identified by our firmness of thought and opinion. Our confidence in engaging issues is fortified by both study, as well as our ability to observe and predict the behavior of others. Our mind functions in terms of principles, which act as a synthesizing agent to address problems. Fundamentally, we know that the way we define a problem establishes the solution to it. Therefore, we rarely let others define problems in their own terms. The key quality is that we see the underlying structure of circumstances and know which pieces are essential and those that are not. This is why some people see us as a strategic, integrative thinker, who grows through centralizing and deepening any particular application. We can also be identified by our decisiveness, which by its nature is dominating and impressive in its capacity to formulate a unique solution. 

Another quality is our capacity to immediately see what is not working, which is often expressed in critical or condescending ways. The qualities of mental endurance and independence of thought also reflect this detached, impersonal way of coming to conclusions after considerable effort. In this process, every rational or logical solution is considered. At some point, a shift occurs where everything becomes clear and the solution reveals itself. While we are not outspoken in the fact gathering process, as soon as clarity is reached, we feel compelled to present our ideas, unblemished by any consideration for political correctness. Like those with the Intentional Intelligence, our communication is known for its brevity and straight to the point quality. The length of time a problem is engaged is usually directly related to the complexity of the problem being pursued. 

Once engaged, we Orchestrators, like Intentional Intelligence individuals, are incredibly persistent, convergent, and linear in our pursuit of Truth. Like the Visionary Intelligence, those of us with Orchestrating Intelligence arrive at our own conclusions without being influenced by others. Despite our lack of personal concern about people issues, we are in touch with the larger essence of a problem and want to solve it, taking into account what people as a whole need. Another giveaway for our Orchestrating thought process is the desire to break a problem down into orderly segments, which are sequentially considered. More than any other Creative Intelligence, this process contains a sense of reality with an urgent demand to address things as they are without being attached to any predetermined or predefined future. 

Our strength comes from being able to experience our truth in advance of doing something. To the small degree we use our emotions, they help us integrate and bring together our body and mind into one focused experience. When we cut ourselves off from others, our isolation becomes the barren anger that drives us to torment others. If we have lost our sense of compassion for others, we can only recover our balance by melting our anger. The heat of our emotions warms up the frigidity of our thoughts, which is grounded by the sensations, which we hold dear. We instinctively protect ourselves through bravado and when this does not work, we make others regret the day they were born. There is nothing we will not do to make others uncomfortable, if they attempt to abuse us.

We are identified by our firmness of thought and opinion. Our confidence in engaging issues is fortified by study, as well as our ability to observe and predict the behavior of others. Our mind functions in terms of principles, which act as a synthesizing agent to address problems. Fundamentally, we know the way we define a problem establishes the solution to it. Therefore, we rarely let others define problems in their own terms. We see the underlying structure of circumstances and know which pieces are essential and those that are not. This is why some people see us as strategic, integrative thinkers, who grow through centralizing and deepening in any particular application. We also can be identified by our decisiveness, which by its nature is dominating and impressive in its capacity to formulate a unique solution.

Another quality is our capacity to immediately see what is not working, which is often expressed in critical or condescending ways. The qualities of mental endurance and independence of thought also reflect this detached, impersonal way of coming to a conclusion after considerable effort. In this process, every rational or logical solution is considered. At some point, a shift occurs where everything becomes clear and the solution reveals itself. While we are not outspoken in the fact gathering process, as soon as clarity is reached, we feel compelled to present our ideas, unblemished by any consideration for political correctness. Our communication is known for its brevity and straight to the point quality. The length of time a problem is engaged is usually directly related to its’ complexity.

Despite our lack of personal concern about people issues, we are in touch with the larger essence of a problem and want to solve it, taking into account what people as a whole need. Another giveaway for an Orchestrator Mental Body is the desire to break a problem into orderly segments, which are sequentially considered. This process contains a sense of reality and an urgent demand to address things as they are without being attached to any predetermined or predefined future.

As an Orchestrator Mental Body we tend to define everything external to us and do not allow others in. Everything therefore becomes how to meet us in the way we wish to be met. Anyone who projects a victim mentality upon us will be shut down immediately. We tend to dislike those who will not speak up or represent themselves in a responsive manner. Those who are emotionally needy, sentimental or excessively reactive tend to be more work than we need or want to confront. Obsessive individuals who demand more energy than they are worth also repulse us. Since we sometimes suffer from egotism and excessive pride, anyone who does not acknowledge our power may be perceived as an adversary. Since anyone with ambition is easy to control, we support it. Anyone whose ambition is impossible to define becomes an unknown in the equation, which makes them unpredictable which upsets us. We also despise individuals with a lot of fear and self-pity. We seek to attract those at the top of their game who have a spark of originality and a willingness to dare to be great. Others without this commitment tend to frustrate and polarize us.

We tend to fall into physical distortions of our reality and accentuate our outer strength whenever challenged by others. For this reason, our image of strength and our sense of personal destiny cannot be challenged without feeling personally attacked. When this occurs, unconsciously we seek out others to confirm our power and prestige. Internally, we tend to emphasize our absolute right to manifest what we want the way we want it. In this way, we can end up creating a false persona to fit the image of being indestructible and unwavering in our belief about who we are. We do this because any sense of doubt or self -questioning can be perceived by others to be a weakness. Sometimes when we are threatened we can react by showing others just how destructive we can be. This puts others on notice because we demonstrate the reality that we would rather have no result than to have a compromised, mediocre result. Occasionally, we feel compelled to clear the decks so everyone can embrace a completely new solution. It has been our experience that when others have been deprived of a compromised solution they will be fully motivated to bring about the change we want to make.

We are concentrated and one-pointed [Zen: Do one thing at a time, and do it well] and we are able to make decisions on the fly with relative ease. We operate in a straight line, like an arrow seeking its target. We expand or explode into imbalances in Intent so that Life energy is free to manifest. We are called Orchestrators, because we integrate different perspectives within ourselves and then use this unified framework to set a course that others either respond or react to. We are clear-cut, hard-edged, and thorough in our in-depth appreciation of detail and can articulate and put together a large external picture. Metaphorically, we are the primary masculine energy of the Father.  For this reason, the masterful use of tools is what provides a sense of progress and fulfillment. Our Orchestrating Intelligence relates everything to the Self, so we can be considered self-centered, because others do not understand the unifying effect and benefit of our self-focus. This quality makes us decisive, and we can arrive at answers quickly with minimal interaction with others. We also have little regret or doubt. We protect our conclusions to the end, even though we may change them along the way. 

Since we engage will on a personal level, we have an unshakeable fixity of purpose. This self-focus also makes us very clear about what is relevant in particular situations. This means we focus on the key elements or principals driving a process and do not get bogged down in the details. We take our experience and synthetically project it in a way that can be seen as asserting itself on the world. We see what is needed and get to the core facts of the matter through a rigorous internal methodology that guarantees an answer in a minimal amount of time. We work by being the expansive Thought that moves forward. Often, we are seen as selfish, self-centered people, preoccupied with the principles being expressed. 

Once a decision is made, we mobilize all resources quickly towards our goal. Our minds hold a large, broad vision that initially, we leave open when considering a plan of engagement. We try to position a plan in a way that maximizes benefit and minimizes the ability of others to affect it. This upsets those who wish to be consulted before any action is contemplated. The appearance that Orchestrators are unwilling to share reflects our personal decision making process. We do not like opening our thinking process to others. This trait further amplifies the belief that we are hard to deal with. Common terms for understanding about how we unify various concepts do not exist, because, paradoxically, we integrate the positive and negative simultaneously. This, and our quick ability to move forward, distinguishes us from the Visionary Intelligence thinker. 

We accomplish this with a brevity and economy of effort that frequently leaves people behind. Like the Investigative Intelligence, Orchestrating Intelligence uses the mental plane to integrate all other types of knowing. Orchestrating Intelligence is outspoken, unembellished in its communication, and willing to cut through all obstacles to fulfill personal goals. We are direct, unequivocal and committed to making our points in a way that breaks through preconceptions about a situation. Our unique power is to destroy the illusory by refusing to get caught up in Objectification and Subjectification. We do, however, get caught up in a bit of Idealization around our ability to see and anticipate potential obstacles. While capable of great convergence, we tend to fall into patterns of extreme discrimination, where we exclude rather than include. 

We do not like to rely either on people who, or information that cannot be verified. Like the Investigative Intelligence, we evaluate information sources based on the level of perceived bias. Unlike the Investigative Intelligence, we do bias our perception based on past experience, both positive and negative. This is because our evaluations are based on real world experience and not abstract detachment. We are committed to putting the full power of our minds on the line, compelling all Thoughts to serve the chosen goal. This has made us extremely successful on standardized tests. 

Our Orchestrating Intelligence reinforces and grounds the Investigative Intelligence; emphasized by Investigative Primary and Secondary Expressions. When the two are integrated, it greatly magnifies our effect in the world. The opposite is often true when we put the Orchestrating Intelligence with the Compassionate Intelligence. The emotional connection of the Compassionate Intelligence with the Orchestrating Intelligence, makes it easier to connect with them. Those with the Orchestrating Intelligence are more likely to centralize power in their intellectual (Subjectification) and physical (Objectification) frameworks before investing (at all) in the emotional feeling realm. The Orchestrating Intelligence is extremely sensitive to touch, especially when it relates to conveying a vibratory quality.

We can recognize the importance of our Orchestrating Intelligence by how we overdo, under-do, or react to it. When we overdo this Intelligence, we become dominating as we demonstrate the impressiveness of our thinking (by imposing it on others). When we under-do this Intelligence, we become reserved and unwilling to speak out in all but brief terms. When overwhelmed and/or discounted by individuals who do not accept this form of Intelligence (particularly if they are not willing to consider a larger, more integrated plan), we become extremely one-pointed and manifest our intellectual endurance in trenchant ways. It is interesting to note that while our Intelligence can be affirmative, it does not want to get lost in self-flattering delusions. When we are hurt, we become outspoken and isolating at the same time to protect ourselves. 

What people do not understand is that we see ourselves as changing the status quo. What we seek to eliminate is the irrational or illogical aspects of business that do not have long-term benefits. Sometimes this involves eliminating or changing the way people are hired. Others tend to believe our attempts to minimize the impacts of people as being hard and cruel because of our attention to structure and not paying for anything that does not go to the bottom line. Others tend to believe that we are controlling and suppress the good will of people because we are personally stuck up or inhibited. The truth is, we see our contribution as one that enhances predictability. If the human constraints of a project and the needs of the people are ascertained to be at a certain level, we do want to maintain our agreements. What drives us crazy are people who complain or moan that they deserve more or they will strike. This irritates us because it adds unpredictability to the bottom line. When we have commitments to other people and some smaller group has an adverse impact on the quality of the whole project, we do not believe that it is fair. Therefore, it is natural that we push back with everything we have. Being able to bring projects in under budget is also reinforced by a sense of impatience to drive the process forward. Our stubbornness can also be a good managerial quality because we want everything to come together in a particular way. 

As an individual with a Tertiary Orchestrating Intelligence, we tend to define everything external to us and do not allow others in. Everything therefore becomes how to meet our Intelligence in the way we wish to be met. Anyone who projects a victim mentality upon us will be shut down immediately. We tend to dislike those who will not speak up or represent themselves in a responsive manner. Those who are emotionally needy, sentimental or excessively reactive tend to be more work for our Intelligence than we need or want to confront. Obsessive individuals who demand more energy than they are worth also repulse us. Since we sometimes suffer from egotism and excessive pride, anyone who does not acknowledge our power may be perceived as an adversary. Since anyone with ambition is easy to control, we support it. Anyone whose ambition is impossible to define becomes an unknown in the equation, which makes them unpredictable which upsets us. We also despise individuals with a lot of fear and self-pity. We seek to attract those at the top of their game who have a spark of originality and a willingness to dare to be great. Others without this commitment tend to frustrate and polarize us.

We tend to fall into physical distortions of our reality and accentuate our outer strength whenever challenged by others. For this reason, our image of strength and our sense of personal destiny cannot be challenged without feeling personally attacked. When this occurs, unconsciously we seek out others to confirm our power and prestige. Internally, we tend to emphasize our absolute right to manifest what we want the way we want it. In this way, we can end up creating a false persona to fit the image of being indestructible and unwavering in our belief about who we are. We do this because any sense of doubt or self -questioning can be perceived by others to be a weakness. Sometimes when we are threatened we can react by showing others just how destructive we can be. This puts others on notice because we demonstrate the reality that we would rather have no result than to have a compromised, mediocre result. Occasionally, we feel compelled to clear the decks so that everyone can embrace a completely new solution. It has been our experience that when others have been deprived of a compromised solution that they will be fully motivated to bring about the change we want to make.

As a parent, we feel the need to support our children in discovering their own power to change their lives. While we want them to succeed, we also need them to understand that they need to sink or swim on their own. What affects us the most is timidity or lack of clarity of purpose. What we admire is our children taking charge, figuring out their options and possibilities. We can easily be enrolled in their plans when they state what they need and even negotiate with us. What they learn is that forthrightness can pay off. We also come to understand that confusion and delay result in considerable self-inflicted pain. We also appreciate when they can analyze the causes of their own failure and propose solutions for the situation. The more our children act in a courageous manner, the more we treat them as adults. If they contain and express a lot of emotion, we attempt to support them in channeling this power in friendships or in groups, or we personally do not encourage it. 

We are proud when they become able to manipulate their circumstances and define their own course of action. We also enjoy it when they become extremely active and passionate in their own personal causes or sports. This is because we believe competition will bring the best out in everyone. We reward academic performance as well as leadership in clubs or sports because we have a predisposition to physical activity. Any child who responds to our suggestions or who through intelligence, perseverance, and wit, finds a way to distinguish themselves from others, deserves our complete support.

We can easily be enrolled in our child’s plans when they state what they need and even negotiate with us. What they learn is that forthrightness can pay off. Our children come to understand that confusion and delay result in considerable self-inflicted pain. We also appreciate when they can analyze the causes of their own failure and propose solutions for the situation. The more our children act in a courageous manner, the more we treat them as adults. If they contain and express a lot of emotion, we attempt to support them in channeling this power into friendships or in groups, or we let them sink or swim on their own. This is because we don’t want our children to be overly emotional. We are proud when they are able to manipulate their circumstances and define their own course of action. We also enjoy it when they become extremely active and passionate in their own personal causes or sports. This is because we believe competition brings out the best in everyone. We reward academic performance as well as leadership in clubs or sports because we have a predisposition to physical activity.

Any child who responds to our suggestions or who through intelligence, perseverance, and wit, finds a way to distinguish themselves from others, deserves our complete support. On the other hand, if a child cannot define himself or distinguish himself in some way, we typically indicate our lack of approval by ignoring him to some degree. In this way we believe we reward self determination and convey our disdain for mediocrity. Children with Intentional, Investigative and even Patterning Intelligence can blossom in this environment, while those with Visionary, Compassionate and Inventive Intelligence will be more touch and go depending upon how much interaction we have with them at an early age. The key thing to remember is that the Orchestrator Mental Body expects to be listened to, to have our orders followed and to be respected, otherwise there are problems. This style is a naturally action oriented, big picture doer. It is second most masculine Mental Bodies and may not think it is appropriate to show too much affection with children.

Compassionate Intelligence Tertiary Mental Body Expression

(formerly known as Server, Interpersonal or Ray 2)

Known as a caretaker of others. As Tertiary Compassionate Intelligence, we need to believe in the good hearts of our friends and partners in order to invest in any relationship.  Our desire is to be supportive and accepted by others for who we are.  Our instinct is to sacrifice ourselves so that others are protected or do well. We become fixated on hearing the complete truth from our partners and friends. Any shading of the truth brings up distress and fear that they may eventually betray us. 

What we are seeking is a state of energetic continuity and clarity, where we act for you even though you may not be present at the time. This type of illumination is difficult to convey, but it comes from knowing you in your essence. Since we easily absorb the fears, doubts, and dissonances of others, it doesn’t pay to establish friends or partners who cannot make a commitment or keep their agreements. What we desire are individuals who can counterbalance and offset our own anger, fear, or misunderstandings. This means that others need to be able to meet us emotionally by being emotional themselves. 

Only when we are seen in this way, do we release our attachments to acting out with others who may not understand us as well. The core quality we provide is common sense feedback about what is appropriate and what is not. We also have the sense to know that there is a sense of timing in bringing up topics that can make a difference in others being understood or not. The key quality of Compassionate Mental Body Intelligence is how open and supportive we are with our friends, family, and partners in a way that we are not with others. With these individuals, we feel included and expansive and more than anything else, seen and accepted by them. This means we trust them not to judge us and even to take our side when others challenge us. The more we doubt that they will be there for us, the less we are encouraged to be there for them. 

Compassionate Mental Bodies want to get along and go along, letting others define what and when it is needed. As a result, we don’t have clear boundaries or state what we need, instead letting others do the talking for us. This strategy makes us seem harmless so no one wants to attack us. The real issue is that we get into situations where others expect us to do the things we have been doing, when we are overwhelmed and tired of doing them. Our whole desire to be supportive, is to be accepted by others for who we are. Unfortunately, our lack of limits invites others take advantage of us, and until we extricate ourselves from our over commitments, we have no peace or relaxation. We also take on the problems of others in order to prove our value to them. The more we are trying to help everyone, the less respect we get from people around us because everybody sees how our lack of focus compromises the thing we are trying to accomplish. Our power and prestige grows to the degree that we are selective about who we support and when we support them. The main lesson seems to be to help people learn to do something themselves, so we can keep moving on to new people and not get stuck.

As a Compassionate Mental Body, we become fixated on hearing the complete truth from our partners and friends. Any shading of the truth brings distress and fear that they may eventually betray us. What we are seeking is a state of energetic continuity and clarity, where we act for you even though you may not be present. This type of illumination is difficult to convey, but it comes from knowing you in your essence. We need to believe in the good hearts of our friends and partners in order to invest in any relationship. Since we easily absorb the fears, doubts, and dissonances of others, it doesn’t pay to establish friends or partners who cannot make a commitment or keep their agreements. What we desire are individuals who can counterbalance and offset our own anger, fear, or misunderstandings. Others need to be able to meet us emotionally by being emotional themselves.

Only when we are seen in this way, do we release our attachments to acting out with others who may not understand us. The core quality we provide is common sense feedback about what is appropriate and what is not. We also know that there is a sense of timing in bringing up topics that can make a difference in others being understood or not. Our key quality is how open and supportive we are with our friends, family, and partners in a way that we are not with others. With these individuals, we feel included and expansive and more than anything else, seen and accepted. This means we trust them not to judge us and even to take our side when others challenge us. The more we doubt that they will be there for us, the less we are encouraged to be there for them.

A Compassionate Mental Body individual is absorbent and accumulates experience without synthesizing it. This means we seek continuity by comparing various past experiences to a potential developing reality. If the conclusions are problematic, we are warned of consequences. Our tendency to jump to inaccurate conclusions is high because of how intuitive our process is. The ability to detach from patterns of the past and maintain a stillness, silence, or clarity of mind that can consider all possibilities offsets this effectively. The very openness to possibilities is a counterbalance to over-judgment or discrimination where criticalness distorts the thought process. A key consideration is knowing that we do best without a fixed timetable or the need to decide quickly. Any pressure to think or make decisions quickly based on what others need tends to minimize our own clarity or ability to represent our understanding. We know ourselves when we give ourselves time to be comprehensive and complete. We also do better in our thought processes, when we distinguish what we need from what others need from us. 

We are receptive, open, inclusive, non-decisive, and abstract in our nature. Common understanding is our goal as individuals learn how to share their knowing. Relatedness, not distinctiveness, drives the thought processes for Interpersonal Intelligence individuals. Our thoughts are more amorphous and somewhat unfocused. Some would consider us firm or hard, particularly when they do not understand us.  Others may not appreciate our type of mental process which slowly evolves and becomes less fixed over time and with experience.

We tend to evolve in our views as we learn about our own natural boundaries and the boundaries of others. Metaphorically, we primarily represent the mother or feminine framework (where being present with others enables us to deepen). We are commonly seen as reflective affirming the nature of others. Being committed to wholeness, prevents our becoming judgmental or cutting (but we do resist making decisions until something is clear).  We take input from others with the intention of finding a middle ground, so we can contribute without needing to pre-define what occurs. We empower individuals to work most effectively in environments where stillness and quiet allow possibilities to emerge. We either need to be alone or to bring others into a coherent, open way of connecting to a process by accepting and valuing our own inner knowing. This tendency to synthesize understanding with others paradoxically tends to minimize direct personal analysis, because much is commonly left unsaid (but implied for those who have ears to hear).  We support mutually created solutions defined by those sufficiently conscious to know the choices possible in each moment.

What is not understood is that our over protectiveness or over-guarding of others is primarily a way to distract ourselves from our own fears and sensitivities. The biggest problem is that we get sucked into our own sense of self-pity and vulnerability so we compensate by focusing on others. Some would say that we see this connection by how we voluntarily take on the pain of others. We see our over attachment to protecting others as a safe way of dealing with our own pain because we are afraid to be selfish or demanding. It is also true that self-pity drives us into self-critical denial of our own faults which can be verified when we feel the necessity of criticizing and correcting others.

Having a Compassionate Mental Body tends to make us receptive and absorptive as we internalize what others say. Our way of interacting focuses us more on others than ourselves. Everything therefore becomes how to meet others where they are. Anyone who denies goodness in others or personally attacks (or judges) another for their own benefit is not likely to get any support or sympathy from us. We particularly react to those individuals who will not be human, personal and real but instead hide behind the robes of academia, scholarly or divinely inspired authority. It is also irritating when others think they are right, we internally believe they are wrong and we cannot convince them otherwise. Ultimately, we feel compelled in certain situations to distance ourselves from these people. We react to those who are arrogant, willful and/or power hungry. We also hate situations where there are mandated social classes or exclusivity. What tends to imbalance us is absolute coldness and indifference to others. We use tough love and coldness in return to teach them a lesson. Even so, we have a soft spot for the underdog. We also feel compelled to protect anyone who is unfairly criticized, judged or made wrong, particularly when they are trying to make a contribution. Anyone who is needlessly harsh or critical is seen as an obstacle to growth and unity. What we find repugnant is corruption and moral cowardice particularly when it comes to being safe and secure rather than taking care of others or growing.

The main challenge in affirming ourselves is that we can’t love ourselves unless others demonstrate their love for us. This sets us up to accentuate our need for others to love us and minimize the need for us to love ourselves. It also puts in place a need to prove we are unselfish even if we cannot live up to this goal. When we are we caught in this paradox we unconsciously invert selfishness and unselfishness by believing that everyone else is more unselfish than we are. This inversion is further proven to us when our parents react to our unselfish acts by withholding their love as if the acts were selfish. Commonly this shows up as a child believing their parents’ selfish acts are actually unselfish and that our own acts to prove ourselves unselfish must, in fact, be selfish. In this framework, we, in trying to prove that we are unselfish inadvertently act selfish and cannot see it.

Compounding this problem is how this issue is linked with food as love. Whenever this confusion arises, we seek out the comfort of food as a way to validate our physical bodies that inadvertently minimizes our active use of bodies. This desire to feel full is a substitute for a desire to be safe. The more we gain weight the more we feel isolated from society around us that reinforces our fears of rejection, abandonment, and isolation.

Our desire for safety is paramount and our undue sensitivity can translate into something like being a hypochondriac. The core issue is becoming fearful about fear. This prompts us to become over reactive about anything that looks different or unusual to us. It also sets us up to be overwhelmed by the negative aspects of life. We fall into self pity and other forms of depression more easily than other energies. While self pity can show up with our intelligence on any level it is particularly emphasized in the tertiary position as a way of protecting ourselves by fixating on our fears to distract us from the real fears in our life. We also use self pity as a way to distract ourselves from the unbearable truth of certain circumstances which we are not willing to engage. As a result we make up certain truths that we call our personal wisdom to explain why we can’t deal with certain issues in life. This inadvertently keeps us stuck in layers of fear we are unwilling to unravel. It is important to note that learning to love ourselves and clear up the differences between being selfish and unselfish can release us from these problems.

Energetically, we are composed of a complete diversity of experience with Intuition and Feelings leading the way at 30% each. Our Thoughts add balance with another 20%. This allows Sensations and Emotions to complete the pattern at 10% each. Strong Feelings and Emotions empower our Intuition.  With such strong Intuition, non-concrete types of knowing supersede the regular way others perceive their own thinking.  Our inclusive way of understanding motivations and emotional desires is our strength. This potent way of seeing promotes internal faith and external devotion to the maximum in others. If we deny our Feelings, we cut ourselves off from being able to see and assemble the larger visions that arise from trusting our inner Light. Instinctively, we attempt to protect our self by denying any comprehensive inner vision that counters or opposes the truth of others. When this occurs, we end up (when repeatedly abused in this way) a shell of a person attempting to vainly demonstrate a capacity to be independent, tough, and to take care of ourselves.

Compassionate Intelligence is absorbent and accumulates experience without synthesizing it. This means that we seek continuity by comparing various past experiences to a potential developing reality. If the conclusions are problematic, we are warned of consequences.  Possible negative outcomes can overwhelm any situation, be it good or bad. In other words, the tendency to jump to inaccurate conclusions is high because of how intuitive the process is. What offsets this challenge is the ability to detach from patterns of the past and maintain a stillness, silence, or clarity of mind that can consider all possibilities. The very openness to possibilities is a counterbalance against over-judgment or discrimination where criticalness distorts the thought process itself.

A key consideration is knowing that we do best without a fixed timetable or the need to decide quickly. Any pressure to think or make decisions quickly based upon what others need tends to minimize our own personal clarity or ability to represent our understanding. We know ourselves when we give ourselves time to be comprehensive and complete. We also do better in our thought processes when we distinguish what we need from what others need from us.  Our strength is our ability to assemble minute details into a larger understanding that reflects others completely. It is our sensitivity to others that helps others identify this Intelligence. 

When we are fully developed, we are frequently considered to be kind, gracious, and abundant, which are all reflections of the feminine qualities we manifest. The lack of structure, concrete steps to take action or a sense of urgency are all reflections of Compassionate Intuition and Feminine self-mastery, which demonstrates results when appropriate and are not forced. Another indicator for us is the seeming inability to reject anyone or anything, which is the secret of our natural inclusiveness. This is why free association reveals an elaborate network of ways to think based on a capacity to see links and connections, where others commonly see none. It is important to realize that just because this analysis is not ordered and structured in linear ways it does not mean that we are not insightful and competent in seeing the whole picture. This is what makes us a polar opposite to Orchestrating Intelligence. Orchestrating is the masculine to the (feminine) Compassionate way of doing things. Compassionate Intelligence invokes while Orchestrating Intelligence provokes. 

We are receptive, open, inclusive, non-decisive, and abstract in our nature. Our internal development reflects a slow rotation that creates a spherical space where everything can be brought together. We expand or explode imbalances and obstructions in Content (expressed as structure or details), releasing Wisdom and Light.  We are called Compassionate Intelligence, because we primarily deal with what we know about ourselves and how this relates to what we know about others. Common understanding is our goal as individuals learn how to share their knowing. Relatedness, not distinctiveness, drives the thought processes for Compassionates. For this reason, our Thoughts are more amorphous and somewhat unfocused. Some would consider us firm or hard, particularly when they do not understand us.  Others may not appreciate our type of mental process which slowly evolves and becomes less fixed over time and with experience. 

We tend to evolve in our views as we learn about our own natural boundaries and the boundaries of others. Metaphorically, we primarily represent the mother or feminine framework (where being present with others enables us to deepen). For this reason we are commonly seen as a reflective Intelligence that affirms the nature of others. Since we are committed to wholeness, this prevents us from becoming judgmental or cutting (but we do resist making decisions until something is clear).  We take input from others with the intention of finding a middle ground, so we can contribute without needing to pre-define what occurs. 

We are a constantly evolving, deepening Intelligence and we embrace mystery as a key component of our nature. In the outer world, Orchestrating Intelligence is thought of as more masculine because of its order and structure, while Compassionate is considered more feminine because we encourage undefined exploration with no set goals. We are a comprehensive, inclusive wholeness which contains possibilities but we may not organize them in any consistent way. We empower individuals to work most effectively in environments where stillness and quiet allow possibilities to emerge. We either need to be alone or need to bring others into a coherent, open way of connecting to process by accepting and valuing our own inner knowing. This tendency to synthesize understanding with others paradoxically tends to minimize direct personal analysis, because much is commonly left unsaid (but implied for those who have ears to hear).  We support mutually created solutions defined by those sufficiently conscious to know the choices possible in each moment. 

Sometimes people become upset over the passivity and time required to produce self-validated, illumined solutions. These people resist operating outside a set time frame and get triggered by our lack of structure. We are varied in our decision-making process length from virtually instantaneous to an unpredictably infinite amount of time. We ponder the infinite unity of our thought process so that when a decision will be made is unpredictable. Strong, comprehensive, detail orientation is often correlated with what appears to be slow, pondering, labored interactions. Our desire to be kind and soft towards others makes us appear to be resistant to getting things done, when in fact we are just seeking a framework where mutual wisdom can best occur. 

We think that information should be shared and whoever has the most grounded information should define the natural course of action. We may appear to some as resistant to making premature, concrete conclusions (rather than moving the process along, learning along the way). 

Our Goodness shines clearly (by sharing ourselves fully), yet our desire to contribute can get us in trouble if others attempt to ‘subjectify’ us. This shows up as not being willing to remove ourselves from situations that do not support our process. We attempt to serve others at the cost of ourselves, with no apparent gain. The upside is our consciously self-sacrificing nature which often results in others learning more about themselves. This type of Intelligence manifests primarily on the Feeling and Emotional realms. Mother Teresa is an example of a Compassionate Primary (Creative Energy). Those with Compassionate Intelligence are most impacted by Subjectification and are likely to fall into Idealization. Objectification is not critical to this type of Intelligence. 

What is not understood is that our over protectiveness or over-guarding of others is primarily a way to distract ourselves from our own fears and sensitivities. The biggest problem is that we get sucked into our own sense of self-pity and vulnerability and so we compensate by trying to focus on others. Some would say that we see this connection by how we voluntarily take on the pain of others. They see our over attachment to protecting others as a safe way of dealing with our own pain because we are afraid to be selfish or demanding. It is also true that self-pity drives us into a self-critical denial of our own faults which can be verified when we feel the necessity of criticizing and correcting others around us. 

Having a Tertiary Compassionate Intelligence tends to make us be receptive, absorptive and we internalize what others say. Our way of interacting focuses us more on others than ourselves. Everything therefore becomes how to meet others where they are. Anyone who denies Goodness in others or personally attacks (or judges) another for their own benefit is not likely to get any support or sympathy from us. We particularly react to those individuals who will not be human, personal and real but instead hide behind the robes of academia, scholarly or divinely inspired authority. It is also irritating when others think they are right and we internally believe they are wrong and we cannot convince them otherwise. Ultimately, we feel compelled in certain situations to distance ourselves from these types of people. We react to those who are arrogant, willful and/or power hungry.

We also hate situations where there are mandated social classes or exclusivity. What tends to imbalance us is absolute coldness and indifference to others. We use tough love and coldness in return to teach them a lesson. Even so, we have a soft spot for the underdog. We also feel compelled to protect anyone who is unfairly criticized, judged or made wrong, particularly when they are trying to make a contribution. Anyone who is needlessly harsh or critical is seen as an obstacle to growth and unity. What we find repugnant is corruption and moral cowardice particularly when it comes to being safe and secure rather than taking care of others or growing. 

The main challenge in affirming ourselves is that we can’t love ourselves unless others demonstrate their love for us. This sets us up to always accentuate our need for others to love us and minimize the need for us to love ourselves. It also puts in place a need to prove we are unselfish even if we cannot live up to this goal. When we are we caught in this paradox we unconsciously invert selfishness and unselfishness by believing that everyone else is more unselfish than we are. This inversion is further proven to us when our parents react to our unselfish acts as if they are selfish from their point of view by withholding their love.

Commonly this shows up as a child believing that their parents’ selfish acts are actually unselfish. This means that our own acts to prove ourselves unselfish must, in fact, be selfish. In this framework, we, in trying to prove that we are unselfish inadvertently act selfish and cannot see it. Compounding this problem is how this issue is linked with food as love. Whenever this confusion arises, we seek out the comfort of food as a way to validate our physical bodies that inadvertently minimizes active use of our bodies. This desire to feel full is a substitute for a desire to be safe. The more we gain weight the more we feel isolated from society around us that reinforces our fears of rejection, abandonment, and isolation.

Our desire for safety is paramount and it’s likely that our undue sensitivity can translate into something like being a hypochondriac. The core issue is becoming fearful about fear. This prompts us to become over reactive about anything that looks different or unusual to us. It also sets us up to be overwhelmed by the negative aspects of life. This means we fall into self pity and other forms of depression more easily than other energies. While self pity can show up with our Intelligence on any level it is particularly emphasized in the Tertiary position because it is mainly a way of protecting ourselves by fixating on our fears so we can be distracted by the real fears in our life. We also use self pity as a way to distract ourselves from the unbearable truth of certain circumstances which we are not willing to engage. As a result we make up certain truths that we call our personal wisdom that explains why we can’t deal with certain issues in life. This inadvertently keeps us stuck in layers of fear that we are unwilling to unravel. It is important to note that learning to love ourselves and clear up the differences between being selfish and unselfish can release us from these problems.

As parents, love is the most important quality that we can teach our children. Their sense of safety is always assured, because we make sure they know that no matter what happens, we will always love them. Due to our depth and energetic experience of bonding with our children, it is easy to always know the truth about where they are and what they have done. This makes it possible for us to provide direct feedback as to what is right or wrong, but it may also be easy for us to overdo the feedback.  The key issue with this bond is becoming overly hurt or critical about the performance of our children; this could impact them as an enormous blow provoking shame, blame, or guilt that is out of proportion with the circumstances.

This occurs when we do not know how to moderate our anger or displeasure when a child misbehaves. As the saying goes, “you can attract more flies with honey than vinegar”. The more we use praise and maintain a positive connection with our children they will naturally seek to support our values and rules. If on the other hand, the children become terrorized by our projections of fear, it is likely they will become incapacitated and unable to take any action for fear of dire consequences. This negative feedback prevents the natural feedback loop that encourages children to take risks and grow.

When we operate from this Mental Body love is the most important quality we can teach our children.  We focus on their well-being and their ability to connect to us more than any other Mental Body. We want the child to pay attention to us, otherwise we do not know if the child will operate in a safe manner. Our child’s sense of safety is always assured, because we make sure they know that no matter what happens, we will always love them. Due to our depth and energetic experience of bonding with our children, it is easy to always know the truth about where they are and what they have done. The problem is that we may have difficulty maintaining boundaries with them. This means if we get angry they can take on our anger in a way that is not healthy or appropriate for them. The positive side of this is that they know where they stand with us as they learn to read us energetically making it possible for us to provide direct feedback as to what is right or wrong, although it may also lead us to overdo the feedback. 

The key issue with this bond is our children can become overly hurt or feel we are being overly critical about their performance, which is not our intention.  We want them to get the message about what works and doesn’t work in the world. We may hurt our children when we do not know how to moderate our anger or displeasure when they misbehave. As the saying goes, “you can attract more flies with honey than vinegar”. The more we use praise and maintain a positive connection with our children the more they will naturally seek to support our values and rules. If on the other hand, children become terrorized by our projections of fear, it is likely they will become incapacitated and unable to take any action for fear of dire consequences. Ironically, when our children shut down, we end up becoming tougher and try to make them more independent. Usually this is triggered by their unwillingness to listen to us or engage what they suggest. This negative feedback prevents the natural feedback loop that encourages children to take risks and grow.

We naturally want to be affectionate but recognize that our own upbringing can get in the way of showing our love to the level we wish. When children match or exceed our expectations we can become very easy going and laissez faire with the rules and structure. This is our way of helping our children to find their own optimum Creative Expression. If on the other hand our children do not listen or worse yet, act like they do not care, we feel a strong obligation to keep the pressure on and teach them to respect the rules. We do extremely well with Compassionate children. We feel more uncomfortable with Visionary, Orchestrator or Implementer children because we frequently see them as rebellious and willful. Inventor and Storyteller children can either be extremely compliant or defiant, depending on their ability to listen and respond. Compassionate Mental Bodies also adore children when they are babies, but find it more challenging as the child grows and begins to differentiate themselves from the parent.

Intentional Intelligence Tertiary Mental Body Expression

(formerly known as Warrior, Body Wisdom or Ray 3)

Known as a provider for others. As an Intentional Intelligence Tertiary, our safety is guaranteed by being both physically fit and attentive to what is going on around us. Our objective is to maintain a state of alertness, so no one can take advantage of us. We establish safety zones around us in various ways. In cars and houses, we have keys that help us to control access. In physical proximity to others, we make ongoing assessments about how we will protect ourselves if the need arises. The key issue is that continuity and an ongoing physical presence allows us to build a state of trust with others. Part of our internal safety network is also where we work, play and relax in our life. We use physical objects and familiar locations to anchor our safety and security. These anchors, in addition to our friends, family and partners, make it possible to operate confidently in any situation or circumstance. Martial arts or other forms of self-defense can also prepare us to confront our fears. What we learn to do is to trust our Sensations and instinctive impulses so any issues are quickly noticed. 

Implementer Mental Bodies are ideal for those who do not want to get overly connected or committed in our participation with others. Implementer Mental Bodies are more isolated and often we are lost in our thoughts of how we will improve the current situation. We believe that more interaction does not generate correspondingly more action. Our goal, therefore, is to balance our understanding of the circumstances against how much we think a particular improvement will generate either time or energy savings. The tradeoffs are carefully made so we are not overwhelmed by others attempting to make things better. We also seek time to figure out what processes will work better for them and which routines we need to stabilize our production. It is good for us, when growing up, to have martial arts or team sports experiences where we can implement strategies and explore options. Otherwise, it takes us a long time to find jobs where these types of tradeoffs are analyzed. With this experience, we find our niche more quickly.

As an Implementer Mental Body, our safety is guaranteed by being both physically fit and attentive to what is going on around us. Our objective is to maintain a state of alertness so no one can take advantage of us. We establish safety zones around ourselves in various ways. In cars and houses, we have keys that help us to control access. In physical proximity to others, we make ongoing assessments about how we will protect ourselves if the need arises. The key issue is that continuity and an ongoing physical presence allows us to build a state of trust with others. Part of our internal safety network is also where we work, play, and relax in our life. We use physical objects and familiar locations to anchor our safety and security. These anchors, in addition to our friends, family, and partners, make it possible to operate confidently in any situation or circumstance. Martial arts or other forms of self-defense can also prepare us to confront our fears. What we learn to do is trust our sensations and instinctive impulses so any issues are quickly noticed.

Strength comes from honoring our internal sense of timing and trusting our ability to instinctively act and react without preemptively needing to know what is going on. If we cut ourselves off from our passions by denying our emotional experience, it is difficult, if not impossible to grow. What maintains us is a sense of duty and loyalty to be in the service to others we love. Without these elements being active in our life, we are doomed to the unconscious use of brute force where our natural strategy and tactics will not fully emerge. We instinctively protect ourselves by acting dull and dim-witted so others will underestimate our insightfulness and capacity to produce.

Implementer Mental Body individuals have both tactical and strategic levels. On a tactical level, we like to find the most efficient way to do things and then implement them. On a strategic level, we like to plan how our contribution can be received by others around us. Our capacity to consider options and manage resources can be used to manipulate circumstances and people to fulfill our goals. We like to consider every variable and test it to see what the outcomes would be in any situation. The key quality, which defines this mental process, is that we are internally assessing the results of these experiments, which we are then able to summarize on the spot for others. This assures others that we somehow have our finger on the pulse of any activity and know what is going on, despite appearances to the contrary. We are useful in real time sports activities, business production processes, or strategic business planning operations and organizational leadership. One of the key identifying factors is our desire not to say much or reveal too much of our internal processes for fear others will judge us, because we lack an ability to explain our reasoning well. What compensates for this reluctance is an ability to trust our body sensations and get to the gut level right answer before anyone else does. Another indication is a fixation on what we know even though we may not have the evidence to back it up.

We are able to determine that the degree of resistance in any particular activity can be clarified by the degree of resistance in oneself about that activity. This is what leads the body to innately trust or distrust any particular process based on its defined outcome. We possess a directness and unwillingness to shade the truth or play political games to make things seem more acceptable. As we evolve, we develop more levels of complexity and resilience. In this way we move from a narrow understanding to a relatively broad way of responding physically. The speed of response becomes quicker as the clarity of what works is reinforced. We always operate at the same speed but over time, we build shortcuts, because we recognize in which situations we can cut through the noise and address the core problem, which is our safety. We possess a physical rigidity or tension where we maintain a sense of endurance. When our energy does decline, we are unable to formulate or express clear thoughts.

What others do not understand is that we commonly pretend confusion or plead complexity when we do not understand the operating parameters of a particular assessment or project. What this means is that we need to examine the methods of a project before we comment. In effect, we need to internalize it in our bodies so we can predict the outcomes or potential benefits of a particular process. For some individuals this means sleeping on the process to get a lock on how it actually works particularly when there is an existing model we can study. When a situation or process is only described intellectually, our capacity to understand and replicate it is limited. One other key element is that the more a solution is turned into a practical artifact, the deeper capacity there is to amplify or improve the design by internally modeling it. We have a physical component of our self-expression that can deepen our internal understanding of any outer process. It also suggests that any repetitive physical motion can help deepen our concentration when we focus on an area of interest.

Another side of our process is in the pursuit of answers. Compared to all the other energies, we are the most flexible in creating answers. As long as the solution is effective, the particular process does not matter to us. The only limit to our flexibility is our struggle to make sure that a process maintains the standard or quality that we have come to expect. We are known for our ability to systematically search through different alternatives and eliminate those that do not hold promise. While we pay attention to the details, we also tend to disregard them when they do not seem to have necessary relevance. We can simultaneously explore options, analyze them, and quantify each option’s merits independently.

Our kind of matrix thinking is called concatenation.  We analyze data at the same time we are developing preliminary conclusions. Concatenation is the ability to analyze results based on incremental change in variables or input. We optimize the end result based on knowing exactly what is needed and when it is needed. We are highly deductive and skilled at identifying likely problems in any process. We are incessantly active, manipulative (in an analytical way), and quantifying so choices can be made backed up by scientific assessments. It is important to note that we can be scientific but feel that the science can be overdone and, therefore, we prefer simple solutions. Others typically see us as difficult, but brilliant, eclectic, and penetrating in our analyses. Over time we develop both tactical and strategic perceptions, which, given the proper circumstances, can be acted on immediately. We also work well on brainstorming non-linear abstract problem solving.

We tend to focus on sensations and activity as the primary way to express our Self. Everything therefore becomes how to fit into the structure of what we seek to accomplish. Any individual who discounts effort or denies the value of hard work and does not respect the tactics or strategy of excellence in action had better stay away from us for we have little tolerance for them. We tend to trust only people who are consistent in their word and who are simple in their needs. Anyone who is too complicated or demanding emotionally is moved to the back of the line. We also do not trust individuals who are overly adaptive, seductive or chameleon-like (Inventors). We react to those who have no sense of virtue or loyalty (in our way).

While we admire passion, we do not equate emotional sentimentality with positive expression. We are particularly concerned about others with extreme anxiety, worry or excessive moodiness. It is a warning to us when others exaggerate who they are or are overeager for compromise. We believe any unregulated passion (such as indolence, unreliability, procrastination or self-absorption in suffering) is a character flaw. While it may be a complementary self perspective, we do not like excessive objectivity or unrelenting rationalism without it being based upon some kind of sensory input. Anyone who is hyper-idealistic or in any way impractical in the pursuit of their goals will find it difficult to connect with us. We have particular difficulty with anyone who acts like a martyr when they are not willing to let things occur that would minimize their martyrdom.

We tend to idealize the strength of our bodies believing that our robust appearance will intimidate others. In any physical activity we expect others to defer to us not just because we are physically strong but we are the most effective both tactically and strategically in getting things done. This physical self confidence is also based on the ability to get our needs met. In relationships this shows up as others appreciating our strength and commitment to full, uncensored animalistic expression. The problem with this is that others can sometimes get exhausted and wonder if our fixation on our physical form has become an expression of our materialistic and selfish self expression. This is because we may use our physical expression to distract others from meeting us in a spiritual way. Our partners might seek a greater appreciation for our intellectual, emotional and intuitive sensibilities.

Energetically, we are focused on Sensations, which reflect 60% of our Implementer energy. Thoughts, which compose 30% of our energy, reflect and inform our Sensations. Like Compassionate Intelligence individuals, we use our Emotions (the remaining 10%) to focus and drive desire into form. Our Intentional Intelligence is composed of three major factors of which Sensations are predominant; this means building momentum is critical for us to stabilize our thought process. Strength comes from honoring our internal sense of timing and trusting our ability to instinctively act and react without preemptively needing to know what is going on. If we cut ourselves off from our passions by denying our emotional experience, it is difficult, if not impossible to grow in our Intentional Intelligence. What maintains our Intentional Intelligence is a sense of duty and loyalty to be in the service to others we love. Without these elements being active in our life, we are doomed to the unconscious use of brute force, where our natural strategy and tactics will not fully emerge. We instinctively protect ourselves by acting dull and dim-witted so that others will underestimate our insightfulness and capacity to produce. 

Our Intentional Intelligence has both a tactical and strategic level. On a tactical level, we like to find the most efficient way to accomplish things and then implement them. On a strategic level, we like to plan how our contribution can be received by others around us. Our capacity to consider options and manage resources can be used to manipulate circumstances and people to fulfill our goals. We like to consider every variable and test it to see what the outcomes would be in any situation. The key quality which defines this mental process, is that we are internally assessing the results of these experiments, which we are then able to summarize on the spot for others. This assures others that we somehow have our finger on the pulse of any activity and know what is going on, despite appearances to the contrary.

We are useful in real time sports activities, business production processes, or strategic business planning operations and organizational leadership. One of the key identifying factors is our desire not to say much or reveal too much of our internal processes for fear others will judge us, because we lack an ability to explain our reasoning well. What compensates for our reluctance is an ability to trust our body Sensations and get to the gut level, right answer before anyone else does. Another indication is a fixation on what we do know, even though we may not have the evidence to back it up. Like the Orchestrating Intelligence, our Intentional Intelligence is based on an even more physical assessment of the situation. We are able to determine that the degree of resistance in any particular activity can be clarified by the degree of resistance in our self about that activity.

This is what leads our body to innately trust or distrust any particular process based on a defined outcome. Another indication of our Intelligence is the amount of directness and unwillingness to shade the truth or play political games to make things seem more acceptable. As we evolve, we develop more levels of complexity and resilience. In this way we move from a narrow understanding to a relatively broad way of responding physically. The speed of our response becomes quicker as the clarity of what works is reinforced. It is important to recognize that we always operate at the same speed but with time, we build shortcuts, because we recognize with which situations we can cut through the noise and address the core problem, which is promotes our safety. We possess a physical rigidity or tension, which maintains our endurance. When our energy does decline, we are unable to formulate or clearly express our Thoughts. 

What others do not understand is that we commonly pretend confusion or plead complexity when we do not understand the operating parameters of a particular assessment or project. What this means is that we need to examine the methodologies of a project before we comment on it. In effect, we have to internalize it in our bodies so that we can predict the outcomes or potential benefits of a particular process. For some Intentional Tertiary Intelligence individuals this means sleeping on the process so we can get a lock on how it actually works. This occurs when there is an existing model we can study. When a situation or process is only described intellectually, our capacity to understand and replicate it is limited. Another key element is that the more a solution is turned into a practical artifact, the deeper capacity there is to amplify or improve the existing design by internally modeling it. This reflects that there is a physical component to our self-expression that can deepen our internal understanding of any outer process. It also suggests that any repetitive physical motion can help to deepen our concentration when we focus on any area of interest. 

Our Intelligence is based on the consistent and systematic organization of Life Energy. We use rotary motion to operate in predictable and empowering ways. We always reach for that which is beyond our current understanding by doing something new. We expand or explode obstructions in Intent (similar to Orchestrating Intelligence), releasing Life energy in order to build momentum. Metaphorically, we represent the return of the prodigal son, because we slowly find our way to more powerful options. While we are slow (like a turtle), we are extremely capable and consistent. The paradox is that we are the most clear and precise when dealing with abstract issues. This is because when we become fully developed we are able to relate a physical inner intent to an abstract, outer, Universal Intent. As we become more evolved, we develop a strategic sensibility that is both fabricating, i.e., creative and visionary and calculating. 

We are also called Implementers, because we reflect both the impulses of our physical body and how our creative spirit interacts with that body. For many individuals, it is hard to imagine how we can be both grounded and high-minded. One way this is seen and valued is our increased sense of integrity and an appreciation for loyalty. Some are also surprised to learn that we are highly discriminating when dealing with extremely abstract ideas. This is because, although we like and seek accuracy, we also love economy in motion, where we can be ambiguous about the results. When grounded and high-minded connections are opened up, we become completely clear and single-minded in our pursuit of proven, safe solutions. Most individuals see our sense of determination as self-limiting, when we are not flexible. 

Another side of our process is in the pursuit of answers. Compared to all the other Creative Expressions, we are the most flexible Intelligence in creating answers. As long as the solution is effective, the particular process does not matter to us. The only limit to our flexibility is our struggle to make sure that a process maintains the standard or quality that we have come to expect. We are known for our ability to systematically search through different alternatives and quickly eliminate those that do not hold promise. The irony is that while we pay attention to the details, we also tend to disregard them, when they do not seem to have necessary relevance. We can simultaneously explore options, analyze them, and quantify each option’s merits independently. 

Our kind of matrix thinking is called concatenation, which allows us to analyze data at the same time we are developing preliminary conclusions. Concatenation is the ability to analyze results based on incremental changes in variables or input. We optimize the end result based on knowing exactly what is needed, when it is needed. We are highly deductive and skilled at identifying likely problems in any process. We are incessantly active, manipulative (in an analytical way), and quantifying, so choices can be made that are backed up by scientific assessments. It is important to note that we can be scientific, but we feel that the science can be overdone and, therefore, we prefer simple solutions. 

We think everything should be considered strategically and tactically. While we are resourceful and can be very convergent, i.e., breaking each problem down into its essential elements and processing one element at a time, we are given to rigorous reasoning and an infinite array of distinctions. We combat the shear magnitude of Thoughts we work with by systematically organizing them in prioritized hierarchies that represent our willingness to deal with them. We use reason to build practical structures that guide how and what to think and our development. This is the opposite of the Inventive Intelligence. The common sense of Intentional Intelligence prescribes us to simplifying whenever possible. Remember, we weave together many types of understanding and usually integrate this information from a multitude of sources; we represent our knowing as Sensations in our physical bodies. We can also amplify our Intelligence, when we do not investigate our options fully. Others typically see us as difficult, but brilliant, eclectic, and penetrating in our analyses. Over time we develop both tactical and strategic perceptions, which, given the proper circumstances, can be acted on immediately.

We are challenged by Subjectification and/or Idealization and we are not worried about Objectification, because we feel more resourceful in this area. Usually we overdo our Sensations at the cost of Feelings, but we are also intellectually self-reflective in terms of our Thoughts. What is ironic is that we rarely consider higher forms of knowing but commonly apply these forms to come up with unique and body-intuitive ways of solving problems. This is because we operate at dual levels simultaneously while concentrating on complicated subjects with many variables. We also work well in brainstorming non-linear abstract problem solving tasks. 

Another paradox about our Expression is that, while we have great mental agility, we often get over identified with our physical plane development and become repulsed by how others limit us (and our Intelligence) only to physical activities. This highlights why the theme of our Intentional Intelligence is, “Purpose itself am I.” We do Subjectification, if we become impatient with someone. We can get mentally hyperactive, which is why it is good to have regular physical activity to ground ourselves. We are extremely sensitive to sound and rhythm. 

We tend to focus on our Sensations and activity as the primary way to express our Intelligence. Everything therefore becomes how to fit into the structure of what we seek to accomplish. Any individual who discounts our effort or denies the value of hard work and does not respect the tactics or strategy of excellence in action had better stay away from us, for we have little tolerance for them. We tend to trust only people who are consistent in their word and who are simple in their needs. Anyone who is too complicated or demanding emotionally is moved to the back of the line. We also do not trust individuals who are overly adaptive, seductive or chameleon-like (Inventive Intelligence).

We react to those who have no sense of virtue or loyalty (in our way). While we admire passion, we do not equate emotional sentimentality with positive expression. We are particularly concerned about others with extreme anxiety, worry or excessive moodiness. It is a warning to us when others exaggerate who they are or are overeager for compromise. We believe any unregulated passion (such as indolence, unreliability, procrastination or self-absorption in suffering) is a character flaw. While it may be a complementary self perspective, we do not like excessive objectivity or unrelenting rationalism without it being based upon some kind of sensory input. Anyone who is hyper-idealistic or in any way impractical in the pursuit of their goals will find it difficult to easily connect with us. We have particular difficulty with anyone who acts like a martyr when they are not willing to let things occur that would minimize their martyrdom.

We tend to idealize the strength of our bodies believing that our robust appearance will intimidate others. In any physical activity we expect others to defer to us not just because we are physically strong but we are the most effective both tactically and strategically in getting things done. This physical self confidence is also based on our ability to get our needs met. In relationships this shows up as others appreciating our strength and commitment to full, uncensored animalistic expression. The problem with this is that others can sometimes get tired and exhausted and wonder if our fixation on our physical form has become an expression of our materialistic and selfish self expression. This is because we may use our physical expression to distract others from meeting us in a spiritual way. What our partners might seek is a greater appreciation for our intellectual, emotional and intuitive sensibilities.

As parents, we are very protective and observant of our children. Most would say we are overprotective, particularly in situations where there seems to be little danger. What we are most afraid of is some danger that we cannot predict or plan for. This is why we like to have emergency supplies for any contingency. We also like our children to be physically capable of protecting themselves, which is why we encourage martial arts training, sports, or other team events. What we most seek is to create safety in the home so that our children are confident and capable of taking care of themselves. We also tend to teach our children to be careful of strangers and to have ways to contact us should anything unusual arise. While we are extremely good at protecting our children on a physical level, we are less successful at protecting them from social, emotional, or intellectual attacks. We are the first one to attempt to minimize the effect of these disturbances by teaching our children to be stoic, and we will do anything to prevent these attacks long-term, if possible. This includes speaking with other parents and equipping our children with cell phones or other emergency deterrents such as pepper spray. The key issue is that we do not want our children to become victims because we do not want feel like a failure in protecting them.

When we operate from this Mental Body we are very protective and observant of our children. We commonly seek to keep our child close to us on a body level and also sense psychically when there is some threat to the child’s well-being. Most would say we are overprotective, particularly in situations where there seems to be little danger. What we are most afraid of is some danger that we cannot predict or plan for. This is why we like to have emergency supplies for any contingency. We also like our children to be physically capable of protecting themselves, which is why we encourage martial arts training, sports, or other team events. What we most seek is to create safety in the home so our children are confident and capable of taking care of themselves. To this end, we create structures and rules for them to follow. We teach the value of organization so the family can function efficiently with minimal drama. What torments us is out of control, loud children. This means our children’s friends can sometimes test our patience by their lack of understanding and common sense of what is expected of them.

We also tend to teach our children to be careful of strangers and to have ways to contact us should anything unusual arise. While we are extremely good at protecting our children on a physical level, we are less successful at protecting them from social, emotional, or intellectual attacks.  Our common response is to suck it up and ignore these provocations because they come from weak-willed individuals. We unconsciously communicate that emotional outbursts and emotional manipulation are for those who can’t perform in life. We therefore encourage our children to persevere and be winners by developing their power. What irritates us the most are whiners and complainers or even worse, victims. We are the first to attempt to minimize the effect of these disturbances by teaching our children to be stoic, and we will do anything to prevent problems long-term, if possible. This includes speaking with other parents and equipping our children with cell phones or other emergency deterrents such as pepper spray. The key issue is that we do not want our children to be at the effect of circumstances beyond their capacity.

This Mental Body encourages consistency, timeliness, and productivity. Children are expected to keep themselves busy by doing chores, homework, or sports. A child is encouraged to develop mastery over any topic or activity they perform. Laziness, indifference or a lack of commitment are abhorred. Children are expected to keep their rooms clean and organized. Every child is expected to play their part in keeping the house and yard tidy and functional, particularly for unexpected guests. Parents with this style usually come up with scheduling boards so everyone can identify where a child is and where a child needs to go at any time of day, or night. It is also common for children to be given incentives for performance in all of their activities. This Implementer Mental Body parents work best with Implementer, Orchestrator and Investigator children. It works in sporadic ways for Visionary, Storyteller and Compassionate children. It usually does not work at all for Inventor children who have great difficulties with the consistency, and structure expected of them.

Inventive Intelligence Tertiary Mental Body Expression

(formerly known as Artisan, Harmonic or Ray 4)

Known as a playmate for others. Our main way to protect ourselves is to distract anyone who gets too close or has the potential to hurt us.  Our sensitivity to others helps us to discern those who are dangerous and we keep our distance from them. Our ability to adapt to unique circumstances makes us able to seem part of any group or situation, particularly when going along minimizes the potential for conflict. As a way of neutralizing anxiety, our capacity to talk about anything, anywhere, is a perfect defense mechanism. Our fluidity seems calming to others, because it is not perceived as sharp, cold, or impersonal. In this way, any outcast with a grudge to fulfill would find us a kindred spirit, where we would maximize the commonalities of the experience rather than the differences.

As Inventive Intelligence on the Mental Body we know how to share our struggle and pain, so that others who could be dangerous would see us as common conspirators. The key process to appreciate is that we do not take offense or quickly polarize because of differences, no matter how bizarre. Instead, different types of people capture our imagination and interest, and we protect ourselves by wanting to engage and see the other person’s point of view. 

Inventive Intelligence Mental Body individuals protect ourselves from problems by having preset distractions that occupy us until a solution occurs to us. What makes this process effective is that it allows time to prioritize problems to determine whether they are worth solving. On the other hand, because this process can take an indeterminate time, people around us do not know when to expect a response. To others it seems that we are avoiding the tough questions, or commitments necessary to move forward. What is actually occurring is that problems cycle through at their own rate and if others want a different response, then others need to spend more time with us because the more time spent with us, the deeper we can go with the problems and therefore our priority in solving the them increases. We learn to ignore creative dissonances going on around us. We can turn off our environmental perceptions or limit them in ways so we don’t take on the stresses and/or biases created in the family dynamic. This is our primary way to protect ourselves from parents who are fighting or who are creatively not aligned. On a positive side we can develop in depth relationships when we are alone with another individual, but this depth diminishes greatly when there is more than one person around. The more people we are interacting with, the less band width we have to deal with complex issues and interdependencies between people. This is why in large groups we need to tune all our sensitivity down.

Our main way to protect ourselves is to distract anyone who gets too close or has the potential to hurt us.  Our sensitivity to others helps us discern those who are dangerous and we keep our distance from them. Our ability to adapt to unique circumstances makes us able to seem part of any group or situation, particularly when going along minimizes the potential for conflict. As a way of neutralizing anxiety, our capacity to talk about anything, anywhere, is a perfect defense mechanism. Our fluidity seems calming to others, because it is not perceived as sharp, cold, or impersonal. In this way, any outcast with a grudge to fulfill would find us a kindred spirit, where we would maximize the commonalities of the experience rather than the differences. As Inventor Mental Bodies we know how to share our struggle and pain, so others who could be dangerous see us as common conspirators. The key process to appreciate is that we do not take offense or quickly polarize because of differences, no matter how bizarre. Instead, different types of people capture our imagination and interest, and we protect ourselves by wanting to engage and see the other person’s point of view.

Our strength comes from our endless discovery of what works. It is empowered by our flexibility and diversity. If we deny our thoughts or intuition (feelings and emotions), we cut ourselves off from our creative power and ability to love. This makes us susceptible to addiction, mindless busywork, self-destructive tendencies and distractions that keep us from moving forward. We instinctively protect ourselves from denial and boredom by creating fantasies in which we live and that others cannot take away from us. We avoid setting time oriented goals. We would rather be surprised at our accomplishments than take the chance of judging ourselves for being distracted in pursuit of a set goal.

We are the most feminine, abstract, and able to see ourselves in any dimension. When called to action, we throw off the shackles of our ambivalence or indecisiveness and find ourselves pursuing the truth at all costs. It is our own imagination and receptivity, which allows us to go beyond any previous frontiers. We work by taking external experiences and making them real within ourselves. For example, observing a bird in flight could help us open to the internal courage it takes to put ourselves out there. The freedom of flight could also be a way to internalize the bird’s experience. One reason we are good at languages is because as we hear others speak we can embody and relate to the entire experience. In other words, when we hear new music, we wonder how we could create the same sound. This capacity to internalize an external experience and then imitate it in order to make it our own reveals the full circle of our gift.

We are able to create solutions that are improvised spontaneously and sometimes without premeditation. These breakthroughs provide a sense of joy and satisfaction that anything can be figured out. These joyful breakthroughs can also compensate for the inherent struggle and stress life seems to bring us. As primary change agents, we embody the paradox of our time. How do we deal with the extremes of hyperactivity and indecisiveness that occur in a constant state of refocusing ourselves in new ways? Our desire for beauty or music captures our creative nature. Having a sense of inner connectedness captures the metaphoric potency of a synthesizing or unifying intelligence making our breakthroughs possible. Many would say it is our ability to bridge or bring together different worlds, which makes us such an integrative experience.

What is clear is that our multi-sensory nature facilitates the use of picture and sound to think beyond our current safe boundaries. It is our playful adventure of putting together seemingly irreconcilable concepts that creates satisfaction for us. Our greatness comes from our fluidity and mobility to see how the differences presented in life are actually a form of higher orderliness. Primary indicators of this type of thinking are unpredictable exploration and an expressive, non-linear, and non-categorical thought process that never goes where others think it will. Surprise, interspersed with irritation as we wonder about the relevance of any particular contribution, is how others identify us. Another indicator is the use of color to organize the thinking and make presentations to others. The core motive is to somehow harmonize all thoughts creating greater peacefulness. The degree to which this occurs is the same degree with which we are able to unify ourselves. When this happens, there is no longer a need to present the opposite of what others see. Finally, the inability to operate within a specific time frame sets us apart.

We are grounded in the aesthetic, visual and imaginative realms. We are able to be dramatic, expressive, spontaneous, playful, and paradoxical without effort. We are more feminine than masculine and driven by strong desires to break out of set ways of thinking. We are not protective of the status quo, because better thoughts are always being developed. We are visually acute, musical, and linguistic in nature. We can be visualized as a pendulum oscillating from side to side, yet always returning to center. This constantly reoccurs, because we gather the best options from the periphery and makes them available to everyone.

Accuracy is not relevant; tone and unique connectivity hold much greater importance. We emphasize strong contrasts for dramatic affect and to illustrate our points. We are extremely flexible and pliant and easily impressed by external circumstances. This impressibility is what makes us sensitive and powerful as change agents. It is also easy for us to become distracted by the many of ways to engage our environment. We operate on five levels simultaneously, making it difficult for others to get our full attention at any time. We are rapid, fast gestalt-oriented thinkers, who develop close rapport with anyone we choose. (But this does not mean we want to stay connected.) Instead, it is our curiosity that allows us to unify with others in their thoughts making us effective at bringing new possibilities to the world.

We are most attentive to issues of beauty, where elegant and simple solutions can change the world. We are extremely sensitive to color and tone, which we use to code and organize our thinking. We pursue ideas that bring together competing or conflicted forces so we can operate in unity. We value rugged individualism and stoic indifference more than conforming to the choices of others. Even though we do not focus on factual details, we consider and evaluate all obvious concerns before being willing to make a choice. We need to consider all the issues in relationship to each other (in the larger context) that need to be addressed. We are self-reflective, introspective, and almost obsessively preoccupied by our own way of thinking, which keeps us from becoming bored. We are capable of both analysis and synthesis, but we are more interested in bringing ideas together in new ways. We are free-associating, improvisational, and constantly self-refining. Our interests are determined by our Primary Creative Expression, and may not be wide ranging (depending on this energy).

We are peculiarly abstract. We focus on symbolic images and rely on figurative frameworks for expressing our knowing. Our imagination encourages many kinds of artistic expression, particularly using our hands. We transcend time, which makes it more difficult to follow our thoughts. Instead, we trust that everything will show up when it shows up. We are extremely sensitive to tension and intellectual conflicts, as we try to bring about harmony under all circumstances.

We protect ourselves primarily through distraction, from our lack of confidence and composure. All we need is to withdraw our attention from how others do not accept us, deny how they perceive us and ignore their lack of expectations about us. This creates a wall between us and others where we can live through our own fantasies and never test them under real world conditions. This way can maintain our delusion of being consistently unpredictable and unreliable (pretending never to care how things turn out). In reality we do care and our worry and agitation about how others may not accept us is the proof. While we may hide behind inertia, indolence and procrastination, we actually want to prove our greatness and capacity to contribute. We need to set aside our fears about what others think and focus entirely on how we can best express ourselves. We can also use unexpected opportunities to step into the ring and conquer our fears. Most of all we can start to build a consistent framework to follow through on those things we want.

Mental Body Inventors tend to think outside the box and bring others new perspectives or possibilities that could benefit them. Everything therefore becomes how to capture the attention and impress others with the viability of our concepts. This requires both internal and external frameworks. Anyone who discounts the value of imagination, creativity and/or a sense of adventure had better avoid us. While we love to convince others of the power of our ideas, we do not appreciate interacting with individuals who are overtly biased, fixated or unwilling to think through things in an open way. We are particularly challenged by authoritarian figures that claim their coldness and objectivity make them better decision makers or administrators of the status quo. We also have a distaste for egghead academics who do not apply what they know but instead are satisfied by theory. As harmonic thinkers we want everything to be anchored in personally real experience. That’s why we seek to provide many examples about how things can operate differently.

Individuals who are intellectually limited, non-creative or caught up in intellectual pride are seen as problematic by us. While we don’t appreciate these types, we do realize we have to politically customize our remarks to get others interested. The only question is, do we want to make the effort to do so. What we love are people who have the capacity to deal with disorder and chaos without losing themselves. Anyone who fears change, denies beauty or discounts evolutionary impulses is seen as a counter-productive adversary to our plan. We also hate those who cannot see larger possibilities or acknowledge better outcomes. While we may be attracted to intense experiences, we are sensitive to drama and anxiety and hyper intensity will burn us out. We hate excessive rules and regulations and try to avoid habitual ritualism or any kind of pompous ceremony. We are environmentally sensitive and sensual, and are automatically repulsed by puritanical or repressive judgment that limits Life flow.

At our core we want to be safe in our differences with others. This means we seek partners who can adjust or move with us as we change. The underlying issue is if it’s not safe for us we need to keep people away from us to avoid being hurt. This leads us to fixate on differences and ignore similarities. As long as there are significant differences that we can accept in each other everything is alright. At the same time being more, better, or different is actually one of the best ways we have to separate and differentiate ourselves from them. We build a sense of self importance by being different causing us to be seen or valued less by our partner. When we’re not affirmed by others we get caught in our fear that we won’t be loved, especially because of our differences. This means we can vacillate between looking for love through differences to switching over to using differences to facilitate differentiation. As a result, others rarely know where we are in the moment and what to do to support us in our growth.

Sometimes, we like to present ourselves as open, undetermined or confused so we won’t have to be responsible for communicating what is going on with us. Alternatively, we act indifferent so we establish the expectation that they should have no expectations about us. Mostly we do this to protect ourselves from being rejected or made a scapegoat for the needs of others. The way out of these fears is to come to accept the unusualness of our way of operating and to be able to tell the truth about the differences and similarities without being reactive. Thus enabling us to be able to understand how both differences and similarities can help us become more conscious human beings. The first step in this process is to really focus on the similarities and not be fearful that they will entangle or engulf us. It also supports us to love ourselves as we are and not define our self in terms of others.

Energetically, we are incredibly diverse. We are lead by our mental focus or mental capacity (which is 40%). Although similar to Compassionate Intelligence in that we have a high degree of Intuition, Inventive Intelligence individuals have double the amount of Thoughts (40%). Having 15% focus on Emotions, 10% focus on Feelings, and 10% focus on Sensations, we are not as grounded in our Feelings as a Compassionate Intelligence individual. The effect of this is that we are more detached and more wide-ranging in our approach. While this openness has the effect of empowering us to think about anything with great clarity, it also can make us extremely impressionable, never forgetting how people put us down. The remaining 25% is focused on the Intuitive sensing of how to know some external experience in an internal way. Our strength comes from our endless discovery of what works. It is empowered by our flexibility and diversity. If we deny our Thoughts or Intuition (Feelings or Emotions), we cut ourselves off from our creative power and ability to love. This makes us susceptible to addiction, mindless busywork, and self-destructive tendencies. We instinctively protect ourselves from denial and boredom by creating fantasies in which we live and that others cannot take away from us. 

We are the most feminine, abstract, and able to see ourselves in any dimension. This means that while we can be the most self-deceptive by convincing ourselves that it is something that it is not, we are also able to see what it is hiding from us. When called to action, we throw off the shackles of our ambivalence or indecisiveness and find ourselves pursuing the truth at all costs. It is our own imagination and receptivity, which allows us to go beyond any previous frontiers. We work by taking external experiences and making them real within ourselves. For example, observing a bird in flight could help us open to the internal courage it takes to put ourselves out there. The freedom of flight could also be a way to internalize the bird’s experience. One reason why we are good at languages is because when we hear others speak we can embody and relate to the entire experience. In other words, when we hear new music, we wonder how we could create the same sound. This capacity to internalize an external experience and then imitate it in order to make it our own reveals the full circle of our gift. 

In this way we are able to create solutions that are improvised spontaneously and sometimes without premeditation. These breakthroughs provide a sense of joy and satisfaction that anything can be figured out. These joyful breakthroughs can also compensate for the inherent struggle and stress that life seems to bring us. As primary change agents, we embody the paradox of our time. How do we deal with the extremes of hyperactivity and indecisiveness that occur in a constant state of refocusing ourselves in new ways? What motivates our thinking is a desire for beauty or music that captures our creative nature. Having a sense of inner connectedness, which captures the metaphoric potency of a synthesizing or a unifying Intelligence, make our breakthroughs possible. Many would say that it is our ability to bridge or bring together different worlds, which makes us such an integrative experience. 

What is clear is that our multi-sensory nature facilitates the use of picture and sound to think beyond our current safe boundaries. It is our playful adventure of putting together irreconcilable concepts that creates satisfaction for us. While many may criticize us for being flighty, our greatness comes from our fluidity and mobility to see how the differences presented in life are actually a form of higher orderliness. Primary indicators of this type of thinking are unpredictable exploration and an expressive, non-linear, and non-categorical thought process that never goes where others think it will. Surprise interspersed with irritation as we wonder about the relevance of any particular contribution, is how others identify us. Another indicator is the use of color to organize the thinking and make presentations to others. The core motive is to somehow harmonize all Thoughts so that a greater peacefulness occurs. The degree to which this occurs is the same degree with which we are able to unify ourselves. When this happens, there is no longer a need to present the opposite of what others see. Finally, the inability to operate within a specific time frame sets us apart. 

We are grounded in the aesthetic, visual and imaginative realms. We are able to be dramatic, expressive, spontaneous, playful, and paradoxical without effort. We expand or explode imbalances and obstructions in Context (usually expressed as self-limiting perspectives or the framework of a possibility), releasing Awareness and Love. We call this Inventive Intelligence, because we integrate multiple sensory domains in a completely metaphorical way. We are more feminine than masculine and driven by strong desires to break out of set ways of thinking. We are not protective of the status quo, because better Thoughts are always being developed. Inventive Intelligence is visually acute, musical, and linguistic in nature. We can be visualized as a pendulum oscillating from side to side, yet always returning to center. This constantly reoccurs, because we gather the best options from the periphery and makes them available to everyone. We create inclusive “thought-forms” that bridge and link with the Universe, allowing us to be flexibly defined and responsive in character. 

Accuracy is not relevant; tone and unique connectivity hold much greater importance. We emphasize strong contrasts for dramatic affect and to illustrate our points. We are extremely flexible and pliant and easily impressed by external circumstances. This impressibility is what makes us sensitive and powerful as a change agent. It is also easy for us to become distracted by the multiplicity of ways to engage our environment. We operate on five levels simultaneously, making it difficult for others to get our full attention at any time. We are rapid, fast gestalt-oriented thinkers, who develop close rapport with anyone we choose. (But this does not mean we want to stay connected.) Instead, it is our curiosity that allows us to unify with others in their Thoughts. This is what makes us effective at bringing new possibilities to the world. 

We are most attentive to issues of beauty, where elegant and simple solutions can change the world. We are extremely sensitive to color and tone, which we use to code and organize our thinking. We pursue ideas that bring together competing or conflicted forces so we can operate in unity. The irony is that we most value rugged individualism and stoic indifference rather than conforming to the choices of others. Even though we do not focus on factual details, we consider and evaluate all obvious concerns before being willing to make a choice. Additionally, we have to consider all the issues in relationship to each other (in the larger context) that are trying to be addressed. We are self-reflective, introspective, and almost obsessively preoccupied by our own way of thinking, which keeps us from becoming bored. We are capable of both analysis and synthesis, but we are more interested in bringing ideas together in new ways. 

Inventive Intelligence, also known as Inventors, can quickly vacillate between hyperactivity and lassitude as we integrate things in our own way and time. Our strength is in our interconnected, synthetic, anagogic (making analogies), and metaphorical capabilities. We are free-associating, improvisational, and constantly self-refining. We are also sensitive, poetic, musical, and interested in literature. Our interests are determined by the Primary Creative Expression, and may not be wide ranging (depending on this energy). One of the primary purposes of our Intelligence is to integrate our new understanding with the understanding of others, when it serves our mission. We tend to be more introspective and quiet, depending on our Secondary, whereas Orchestrating, Visionary, and Patterning Intelligences are more outgoing. 

This Intelligence tends to break down pre-existing structures to find new ways to assemble Thoughts and make them more interesting and useful. We accomplish this primarily through problem solving outside the box; we hold on to a large, Divergent point of view, naturally attracting many different approaches. Because we have a naturally Divergent Decision Making style, we can utilize support in bringing together, stabilizing, and organizing our thought processes. Others may rebel against the time it takes for us to become decisive. 

We are peculiarly abstract. We focus on symbolic images and rely on figurative frameworks for expressing our knowing. Our imagination encourages many kinds of artistic expression, particularly with using our hands. We transcend time, which makes it more difficult to follow our Thoughts. Instead, we trust that everything will show up when it shows up. We are extremely sensitive to tension and intellectual conflicts, as we try to bring about harmony under all circumstances. 

Our energy manifests on Thinking and Feeling levels almost equally. Inventive Intelligence(s) give birth to new ideas and forms of thinking, which, in turn gives birth to new spatial manifestation. This reflects that we use the feminine more than the masculine to achieve our intentions. We are equally vulnerable to Objectification, Subjectification, and Idealization, because we are willing to create different points of view or take on new possibilities at the drop of a hat.

Inventive Intelligence can be used to protect ourselves primarily through distraction, lack of confidence and composure. All we need to do is to withdraw our attention from how others do not accept us, deny how they perceive us and ignore their lack of expectations about us. This creates a wall between us and others where we can live through our own fantasies and never test them under real world conditions. The way can maintain our delusion is to be consistently unpredictable and unreliable (pretending never to care how things turn out). In reality we actually do care and our worry and agitation about how others may not accept us is the proof that we care. While we may hide behind inertia, indolence and procrastination, we actually want to prove our greatness and capacity to contribute. The best way to accomplish this is to set aside our fears about what others think and focus entirely on how we can best express ourselves. We can also use unexpected opportunities to step into the ring and conquer our fears. Most of all we can start to build a consistent framework to follow through on those things we want. 

We can recognize the importance of Inventive Intelligence by how we overdo, under-do or react to it. When we overdo this Intelligence, we become overtly in-your-face expressive (hyperactive), overly poetic or picturesque. When we under-do this Intelligence, we vacillate, are indecisive, and create crises to keep ourselves busy. When overwhelmed and/or discounted by individuals who do not accept our form of Intelligence, particularly when we see immediately what is missing in a situation and this upsets others, we become extremely petulant, sarcastic, caustic or self-pitying. It is interesting to note that while we can be balanced and intuitive, we do not want to get lost in our wholeness. When we are hurt, we become overtly individualistic as a way to protect ourselves. 

As a Tertiary Inventor, we tend to think outside the box and bring others new perspectives or possibilities that could benefit them. Everything therefore becomes how to capture the attention and impress others with the viability of our concepts. This requires both an internal and external framework. Anyone who discounts the value of imagination, creativity and/or a sense of adventure had better avoid us. While we love to convince others of the power of our ideas, we do not appreciate interacting with individuals who are overtly biased, fixated or unwilling to think through things in an open way. We are particularly challenged by authoritarian figures that claim their coldness and objectivity make them better decision makers or administrators of the status quo.

We also have a certain distaste for egghead academics who do not apply what they know but instead are satisfied by theory. As Inventive thinkers we want everything to be anchored in personal real experience. That’s why we seek to provide many examples about how things can operate differently. Individuals who are intellectually limited, non-creative or caught up in intellectual pride are seen as problematic by us. While we don’t appreciate these types we do realize we have to politically customize our remarks to get others interested. The only question is, do we want to make the effort to do so.

What we love are people who have the capacity to deal with disorder and chaos without losing themselves. Anyone who fears change, denies beauty or discounts evolutionary impulses is seen as a counter-productive adversary to our plan. We also hate those who cannot see larger possibilities or acknowledge better outcomes. While we may be attracted to intense experiences, we are sensitive to drama and anxiety and hyper intensity will burn us out. We hate excessive rules and regulations and try to avoid habitual ritualism or any kind of pompous ceremony. We are environmentally sensitive and sensual, and are automatically repulsed by puritanical or repressive judgment that limits Life energy expression. 

At our core we want to be safe in our differences with others. This means we seek out partners that can adjust or move with us as we change. The underlying issue is if it’s not safe for us we have to keep people away from us otherwise we will be hurt. This leads us to fixate on differences and ignore similarities. As long as there are significant differences that we can accept in each other everything is alright. The irony of this situation is that being more, better, or different is actually one of the best ways we have to separate and differentiate ourselves from them. In this way we build a sense of self importance by being different which causes us not to be seen or valued by our partner as much.

When we’re not affirmed by others due to this difference we get caught up in our fear that we won’t be loved, especially because of our differences. This creates us to vacillate between looking for love through differences to switching over to using differences to facilitate differentiation. As a result, others rarely know where we are in the moment and what to do to support us in our growth.

As a result, we sometimes like to present ourselves as open, undetermined or confused so we won’t have to be responsible for communicating with others what is going on with us. Alternatively, we could just act indifferent so we establish the expectation that they should have no expectations about us. Mostly we do this to protect ourselves from being rejected or made a scapegoat for the needs of others. The way out of these fears is to come to accept the unusualness of our way of operating and be able to tell the truth about the differences and similarities without being reactive to others. This enables us to really be able to understand how both differences and similarities can help us in becoming more conscious human beings. The first step in this process is to really focus on the similarities and not be fearful that they will entangle or engulf us. It also supports us to love ourselves as we are and not define our self in terms of others. 

As parents, our children teach us to focus on what is needed. Our natural capacity to follow our own path and do what should be next can be somewhat compromised by the needs of our children. It is interesting to note that our multi-dimensional perspective, both helps us to see our children in new ways as well as keeping us from meeting them directly in their timeframe. The key issue is our own internal fragmentation, where we jump from thing to thing, seemingly at random, to respond to certain opportunities. With children who have an Inventive Intelligence mental body, this is not a problem. However when children do not have an Inventor Mental Body, they interpret our lack of focus as distancing behavior. Instead of the stricter structures and rules, we will tend to be more situational with our children and might operate in unpredictable ways, which they will not anticipate. The key issue is not to judge ourselves harshly for not being like other parents. The reason our children are with us is that we will provide greater opportunities for their internal freedom and development in their own unique way.

When we operate from this Mental Body we believe we need to create priorities that can evolve and change based on what we perceive our child needs. As a parent, this means we develop unique ways to meet each child. Unfortunately, it usually overwhelms our ability to function and take care of ourselves in the world. Our natural capacity to follow our own path and do what should be next can be compromised by the needs of our children. It is interesting to note that our multi-dimensional perspective, both helps us to see our children in new ways as well as keeping us from meeting them directly in the present. The key issue is our own internal fragmentation, where we jump from thing to thing, seemingly at random, to respond to certain opportunities. What we avoid is fixed structure where all the children need to operate in the same way. We also tend to avoid expectations or fixed notions of what our children should do or how they should respond. In fact, we learn who our children are by watching their responses to situations. Unfortunately, we sometimes feel we don’t know the best way to support them, particularly when they are struggling.

Some children have great difficulty with this because they need clear, unambiguous ways of acting (particularly Implementer and Orchestrator children). The key thing we train our children to do is negotiate for what they need and pursue those things they are passionate about. When we see our child respond in a particular way to a sport, musical skill or some group activity, we do all we can to make sure they have what they need to pursue the options they want. We want childhood to be fun and adventurous. There is little a child can do to throw us off course or cause us to give up on them. Children find this an easy touch because we will modify our perception if something is apparently important to them. What we hate is willful bullying and the imposition of authority inappropriately. With Inventor children, this is not a problem. However other Creative Expressions interpret our lack of focus as either ignoring them or as distancing behavior because we don’t seem to be paying attention to the same things. Instead of the stricter structures and rules, we will tend to be more situational with our children and might operate in unpredictable ways, which they will not anticipate. If we have more than one child, we customize our parenting to each child’s expressed needs. We do not feel obligated to impose rules and regulations equitably, we gauge where each child is in their growth, and do what we feel is best for the given situation.

For a short period we will adapt different ways of Parenting to see if they work with our children reflecting our experimental nature and desire to find the right thing for each child. The key issue is not to judge ourselves harshly for not being like other parents. The reason our children are with us is that we provide greater opportunities for their internal freedom and development in their own unique way. While they may not appreciate this in their younger years, they will frequently look back with great nostalgia and respect when they recognize all we have done for them, especially when they become parents. This is the most feminine Mental Body and as such it encourages children to define their own experience, in their own terms, the most. This creates a variety of responses in the children, based on their comfort with not having fixed expectations placed on them. This Mental Body can work particularly well with Inventor, Visionary and Investigator children. It often also has a positive effect for Storyteller children.

Investigative IntelligenceTertiary Mental Body Expression

(formerly known as Scholar, Concrete Knowing or Ray 5)

Known for being an observer. As Tertiary Investigative Intelligence, or Investigators, we seek a sense of structure and concreteness by being able to predict what will happen next. This requires that we become great observer of others and be able to discern what triggers them and in what way. The more we understand the dynamic of potential outcomes, the easier it is to fall prey to our own pride and isolation. What we learn through the Investigative Mental Body is the limit of external prediction. We discover that logic and emotional outbursts only take you so far in understanding humanity. We begin to question that there are absolute solutions or that we can (in fact) be really accurate in our observations.

Though we may continually fail, it does not prevent us from trying again to figure out how things work. Whenever we fail, we search out new sources (information, data, or experts) that can help us to incorporate many of the unknowns we are dealing with. We become aware of how much of our life is actually influenced by the mysteries and limited mastery we experience in our choices. We discover we have a constant drive to understand and yet a limited understanding of how it all works. We also begin to realize that more analysis does not always work. Sometimes we need to punch through the paradigm we are working in and try something else.

We are scientific, objective, detached, and lucid in our observations. We are inductive thinkers who question and investigate everything. We are fact ascertaining and empirical, getting caught up in literal details in ways no other energy can match. We unify and expand information that is complete and balanced between IntentContent, and Context. We are repulsed by and eventually destroy information where the IntentContent, or Context is not in alignment. This Intelligence is called Investigative Intelligence, because we seek to validate (in three ways) the reality of living in the world. These three tests of usefulness reflect the personal relevance of information to serve ContentContext, and Intent.  Investigators focus on the ‘what’, ‘how’ and ‘why’. When we know something, we can then recreate and share it, translating it to the needed frequency depending on the receiving Intelligence, so it can be acted upon.

Initially, we operate on a content level by being able to absorb and present memorized information on demand. This assimilation structure reveals our affiliation with our masculine roots, where knowledge is real, when it can help us act effectively. The process deepens when through Investigative Intelligence, we begin to relate pieces of information together, which then prioritizes our interests in where and what we want to explore. As we go further into the intent, we clarify and energize the priorities, establishing a clear sense of relevance. The symbol for the Investigator is a converging spiral that ends up at a point in the middle. We have highly accurate Thoughts that are sharply delineated, particularly in early development. 

The second phase, that of building content understanding of how the world works, can be challenging if we keep the investigation at a literal level. It is advisable that we allow ourselves to become more abstract thinkers and to prioritize our observations through a basic curiosity about what shows up in the world. We move from observations to explicit provable structure, then to abstract theoretical structure, and finally, to principles or themes that guide choices. This is the world of motivation that allows us to explore our Intuitive nature. 

Eventually we integrate our heart into a broader scope and move into the last phase of knowing that is contextually based. While we do not want to be imprecise, we seek to be inclusive of higher principles or observations that seem to align with our insights.

This is where our thinking becomes interrelated with the thinking of others; we move from knowledge structures to self-understanding to acceptance of a deeper wisdom that is the basis for all-human knowing. The more we study a particular subject, the more we come to a place of choice about how we use that knowledge. We either follow the path of reinforcing what we know or maintain an openness that allows us to reexamine how we think rather than what we think. This is how we deepen from knowledge, to understanding, and finally, to wisdom. Changing the thought process is how we shift from exclusive patterns of thinking to inclusive self-unifying processes. 

Overall, the development of our Intelligence is systematic and extremely focused on what we know can be verified. We only change our frameworks of thought when we discover errors in the rationalization process. While intrigued with details, we have mixed Feelings to what degree we should engage them in a particular situation. Most of the time, we focus on what we know rather than expanding our range, unless we have a predefined interest in a new area. We are extremely analytical on physical, emotional, and intellectual levels, even though we do not often talk about emotional perspectives. 

The most important characteristic is our ability to interpret the facts without distorting them. This leads us to want to say exactly, precisely what is known, without over or under-doing it and without exaggerating or oversimplifying the concept. We are particularly attracted to summary tables where conclusions, principles, and objectives can be expressed and clarified. We love to see the assumptions that lead us to certain conclusions articulated so the obvious errors can be easily identified. This relates to our natural skepticism, which asserts that people have the responsibility to prove the positive; we operate from the assumption that others must prove something in the positive before it is accepted. 

Investigative Intelligence treasures the truth above all. We find it extremely wasteful and despicable for people to present themselves in ways that do not fit any objective reality. We are naturally convergent thinkers and can concentrate easily and effectively in a disciplined way. Others may believe that we are too rational, technical, and unimaginative because of how we try to maintain partiality in the way we validate our Thoughts. We are typically convergent decision makers who amplify a skeptical mindset to reveal the underlying basis for what is true. 

Investigator Mental Body individuals protect ourselves by assessing creative differences with people and choosing how much and how we will engage which keeps us from being overwhelmed and allows us to prioritize the problems we experience. Another aspect of our defense is our ability to be detached and separated from the opinions of others. This makes us appear indifferent to the differences we see around us. Others tend to think we are more mature because we act out less and do not get as reactive as other Mental Body Expressions. Sometimes this can be interpreted as being nerdy or caught up in our own heady intellectual perceptions of ourselves. This Mental Body drives us to try to prove our intelligence or that we are smart in a way that is more internalized than externalized. This means we experience more angst when others do not appreciate how much time and effort we put into thinking through what is needed in a process. Often, our attempts at logic are ignored by our family members. The more our family ignores our intellectual gifts, the more likely we feel the world is unfair. Of course, the more we have Investigator Imprinting on top of Investigator Mental Body, the more doubt we will have about our intelligence.

As an Investigator Mental Body, we seek a sense of structure and concreteness by being able to predict what will happen next. This requires that we become great observer of others able to discern what triggers them and in what way. The more we understand the dynamic of potential outcomes, the easier it is to fall prey to our own pride and isolation. What we learn is the limits of external prediction. We discover that logic and emotional outbursts only take you so far in understanding humanity. We begin to question that there are absolute solutions or that we can (in fact) be really accurate in our observations. Though we may continually fail, it does not prevent us from trying again to figure out how things work. Whenever we fail, we search out new sources (information, data, or experts) to help us incorporate many of the unknowns we are dealing with. We become aware of how much of our life is actually influenced by the mysteries and limited mastery we experience in our choices. We discover that we have a constant drive to understand and yet a limited understanding of how it all works. We also begin to realize that more analysis does not always work. Sometimes we need to punch through the paradigm we are working in and try something else.

We are scientific, objective, detached, and lucid in our observations. We are inductive thinkers who question and investigate everything. We are fact ascertaining and empirical, getting caught up in literal details in ways no other energy can match. We have highly accurate thoughts that are sharply delineated, particularly in early development. We move from observations to explicit provable structure, then to abstract theoretical structure, and finally, to principles or themes that guide choices. This is the world of motivation that allows us to explore our intuitive nature. The more we study a particular subject, the more we come to a place of choice about how we use that knowledge. We either follow the path of reinforcing what we know or maintain an openness that allows us to reexamine how we think rather than what we think. This is how we deepen from knowledge, to understanding, and finally, to wisdom. Changing the thought process is how we shift from exclusive patterns of thinking to inclusive self-unifying processes.

Overall, our development is systematic and extremely focused on what we know can be verified. We only change our frameworks of thought when we discover errors in the rationalization process. While intrigued with details, we have mixed feelings about the degree to which we should engage them in a particular situation. Most of the time, we focus on what we know rather than expanding our range, unless we have a predefined interest in a new area. We are extremely analytical on physical, emotional, and intellectual levels, even though we do not often talk about emotional perspectives. Above all, we treasure the truth. We find it extremely wasteful and despicable for people to present themselves in ways that do not fit objective reality. We are convergent thinkers and can concentrate easily and effectively in a disciplined way. Others may believe that we are too rational, technical, and unimaginative because of how we try to maintain partiality in the way we validate our thoughts. We are typically convergent decision makers who amplify a skeptical mindset to reveal the underlying basis for what is true.

It is also important to realize that when others disregard our thoughts we usually try to build structures to prove what we’re thinking is right. This can result in our minimizing our own growth because we become more worried about what others think about us. Sometimes this expands into trying to prove that our ideas can work which disregards whether it is on our path to express them. In effect, our outer experiences then end up defining us inwardly and we end up carrying around a burden which we somehow can’t let go of. This burden shows up as a series of rationalization or explanations about how we are distressed about the way the world works and can’t seem to get the response we want. Since many of these thoughts require us to become more positional and are based on weaknesses we perceive we need to change, they seldom support our growth. It can lead us to temporary, materialistic solutions that diminish our flexibility. For example, we may want to prove something to others that they do not want to accept which puts us in a conversation where we anticipate and prepare layers of conversation we believe should convince them and which never does. Spending our time thinking of potential responses to misperceptions about us takes much out of our creativity and further reinforces our reactivity. As we all know, the more reactive a person is the more we don’t believe or trust them. This undermines our self esteem and self confidence completely. 

Sometimes, we are clinical, quantifying, mathematical, and measuring. Other times, we are questioning, curious, and inquiring about the facts as we see them. Of all the Intelligences, we are most fearful of Emotions, Intuition, Feelings, impulses and impulsiveness, which is why we emphasize our slow and careful deliberation above all else. We love to establish a certain rigor in how we implement a procedure to identify a distortion of someone else's thinking. We despise those who jump to conclusions too quickly. Through detachment, we deepen our appreciation of our intellectual power. 

We are about learning to share what is known so everyone can use it. As long as an individual is attached and withholding information, we do not know how to effectively express our Primary expression. Initially we are at risk of being defined by the information around us. It is hard for us to see ourselves as creators of information rather than recorders of it. This means we have yet to embody that we are thinkers and not the results of our thinking.

We can recognize the importance of Investigative Intelligence by how we overdo, under-do, or react to it. When we overdo this Intelligence, we become pontificating pundits, theoretical, separative, and non-accepting of other’s Thoughts. When we under-do this Intelligence, we become extremely literal, focusing on minutia and unwilling to stretch our perceptions into new areas of thought. When overwhelmed and/or discounted by individuals who do not accept this form of Intelligence (particularly when they do not see the value of the structures we use), we become extremely despondent and/or impatient regarding the views of others. It is interesting to note that while this Intelligence can be rational, it does not want to get lost in rationalizations. When we are hurt, we become overly logical and avoid Emotions as a way to protect ourselves. 

When we protect ourselves using Investigative Intelligence, we make what we perceive with our sense, the only Truth. If we cannot experience it, it must not be the Truth. In this way, we limit the interaction of Thoughts so they can form a bridge to new possibilities in our lives. The reason we do this is that we believe it is too risky to open up our thinking and accept it because we see it is true. It is much easier to use doubt and skepticism to limit our perception of the Truth. It is even more interesting to get caught up in narrow and prejudicial thinking because it is simpler and easier to accept. While no one wants to consciously limit their thinking, unconsciously our ignorance can prevail. 

When we under-do this Intelligence, we become extremely literal, focusing on minutia and unwilling to stretch our perceptions into new areas of thought. As a result, we follow the Thoughts of those who are authorities and use their perceptions as a substitute for our own insights. The key issue about our power is that we like to feel we understand what is going on. When others reflect our perspective it makes us feel more powerful and clear. Most of the time when others do not have a Investigative Intelligence component we feel obligated to explain and only rarely find people willing to accept our intellectual structure as it is. This is because other Intelligences have different priorities and a different way of talking about their experience. 

It is also important to realize that when others disregard our Thoughts we usually try to build structures to prove what we’re thinking is right. This can result in us minimizing our own growth because we become more worried about what others will think about us. Sometimes this expands into trying to prove that our ideas can work which disregards whether it is on our path to express them. In effect, our outer experiences then end up defining us inwardly and we end up carrying around a burden which we somehow can’t let go of. This burden shows up as a series of rationalization or explanations about how we are distressed about the way the world works and can’t seem to get the response we want.

Since many of these Thoughts require us to become more positional and are based on weaknesses we perceive we need to change, they seldom support our growth. It can lead us to temporary, materialistic solutions that diminish our flexibility. For example, we may want to prove something to others that they do not want to accept, which puts us in a conversation where we anticipate and prepare layers of conversation that we believe should convince them, which in fact it never does. Spending our time thinking of potential responses to misperceptions about us takes so much out of our Creativity and further reinforces our reactivity. As we all know, the more reactive a person is the more we don’t believe or trust them. This undermines our self esteem and self confidence completely. 

As parents, we try to rule our children with logic. It is ironic how we believe there is an answer to every problem we may confront. When it comes to children, we believe our instinctive processes are understandable and therefore even predictable. One source of our wisdom concerning children is how we would be better parents than our own parents. Looking back at our childhood, we believe that by correcting the mistakes our parents made with us, we will actually do better. The problem is that many children do not operate from any logical basis. Reading more books about how to raise children does not prepare us for the reality that growing mutually with them provides. The main issue is what we do when our children do not respond to our perfectly rational way of engaging them. Until we give up our need for structure and actually are present with our children where they are, we will either experience greater rebellion or complacency, both of which are problematic.

When we operate from this Mental Body we try to rule our children with logic. It is ironic how we believe there is an answer to every problem we may confront. Our internal goal is to be attentive, compassionate and neutral in our assessments of our children. We diligently research everything we need to know to best support our children. What we often forget is whether or not they are having fun building social capabilities and that they need emotional support. This is because as children we usually did not get much affection, support with our social awkwardness, or appreciation for our emotional dilemmas. Part of the problem is that we most likely believe that because we survived certain awkward development, they will figure it out for themselves as well. When it comes to children, we believe our instinctive processes are understandable and therefore even predictable. This process reflects that we can intellectualize everything that is a mystery to us. While it may not always make sense to our children, as long as it makes sense to us, we feel empowered.

One source of our wisdom concerning children is how we would be better parents than our own parents. More than any other Mental Body, we evaluate every pattern of our parents and reverse those patterns if they did not work for us, with our own children. Some would say that we have the most discriminating pattern of response when children need our help. Like the Inventor Mental Body parent, we encourage our children to speak up in order to address their needs. What is different is that our responses are always consistent, thoughtful and in some degree, unbending. We are also the key Parental Style that loves precociousness in children. The more a child understands the rationale behind something, or how it works, the more it pleases us. The problem is that many children do not operate from any logical basis. This is particularly true with Inventor, Compassionate and Visionary children.

Reading more books about how to raise children does not prepare us for the reality that growing mutually with them provides. In a way, our experience with our children, prepares us to have more children. The main issue is what we do when our children do not respond to our perfectly rational way of engaging them. Sometimes what our children need to know is that we are emotional, irrational and also passionate about what we want to accomplish. If at certain times we show them this side of us, it will make it much easier for us to maintain their respect and interest. Remember, that our children see us as heroes in the world because of what we know and how we can take charge in times of distress. Until we give up our need for structure and actually are present with our children where they are, we will either experience greater rebellion (with Inventor, Visionary, Compassionate children) or complacency (with repressed Inventor or Compassionate, Storyteller, Investigator children) both of which are problematic. It is possible that we can become competitive with willful or talkative children that don’t listen to our explanations (Orchestrator, Implementer, Storyteller children).

Visionary IntelligenceTertiary Mental Body Expression

(formerly known as Priest, Self-Referencing or Ray 6)

Known for being enthusiastic and cheerleading others. As a Visionary Mental Body Intelligence, our way to create safety is to have faith in something bigger than ourselves. We learn to respond to others with intuitive insights and understanding of their circumstances without even accepting our own. Our need to sacrifice ourselves for some bigger purpose teaches us to grow and adapt, even if we do not seem ready for it. The gift is that this forces us to focus on our personal experience and hold all others’ experience at bay. We absolutely believe that goodness will prevail, even if, so far, it has not.

Visionary on the Mental Body level creates a sense of safety by limiting all those things in our life where we do not have a sense of power or fluidity to personally make a contribution. Anything which seems like a good idea, gets lost in the need to make it personally relevant to our experience. The problem with this approach is that we can become very narrow and sectarian, particularly when we do not have a diversity of experience in our life. The more we define ourselves in a religious or theologically structured way, the more we naturally reinforce the experiences we have over those we do not. This means we tend to grow to fulfill the expectations of those around us and not necessarily take our self and our larger needs fully into account. It is interesting to note that being introduced to new topics sometimes is like a new doorway opening or a new light being shown in our life. This is because we have a tendency to limit our thinking to those areas, which we have internally accepted.

Energetically, we focus on driving forward into our experience, so that we take ownership of it, not as an abstract perception, but as something we inherently know. Due to this, Emotions are our Investigator component at 40%. Strong Feelings at 20%, combining with Emotions, empower our Intuition to guide us with another 20%. Finally, Visionaries use Thoughts to stay grounded and reflect back our knowing at 20%. What is missing is our ability to be connected to our body knowing (similar to the situation with Investigative Intelligence) which is why we need to work on grounding ourselves as much as possible.

Our strength comes from sensing a greater possibility and being able to guide others to it despite adversity. The key is to find the balance between our Thoughts and Emotions, where neither one is in charge. If we deny our Thoughts, we lose our connection to Light and Wisdom. If we deny our Emotions, we cut ourselves off from our inspiration and passion. Both are needed to effectively ground ourselves in our body. We instinctively protect ourselves by denying the perceptions of others particularly about our Emotions and Thoughts. If we cut ourselves off from our Thoughts and Emotions, we retreat into a world of superstition and fear where we think we know what is happening, but we are constantly proving that we do not.

We are unrelenting, idealistic, and unwilling to compromise. We do not give up and do not give in, which allows us to hold on to possibilities and work on manifesting them despite the odds. Instead, we slowly build undeniable associations (about and between what works) that we test by projecting them in the world. What we seek is a reaction from others that can then be directed to serve a new vision. We always seek to push the envelope by making things better. We expand or explode imbalances and obstructions in Content (similarly to Compassionate Intelligence), releasing Wisdom and Light. For the last 2000 years, our Visionary mentality has been completely in ascendance in trying to bring about more positive manifestations of action in the world. We have a rapid, straight-line motion, which attempts to capture the indefinable or inexpressible and put it in our pocket. When we dwell on our own experience, we are completely accurate and effective, but totally capable of gross distortion when dealing with passions of which we have little or no knowledge. We take pieces of what we know and apply the patterns to the world, but find that the world does not respond easily to our suggestions.

Visionary Mental Body individuals use self-referencing qualities to insulate and isolate ourselves from our family patterns. We focus on only what we internally know to be true from our own experience. This means we seldom take in other people’s perceptions, especially when it conflicts with our own experience. The more we have unfettered access to our emotions and feelings, the more likely we have developed intuitive perceptions that go beyond the book learning of our schools and universities. If we are not developed in this area, we frequently get caught up in self-critical patterns where by denying an aspect of ourselves we feel compelled to make it a goal of others. This self -righteous indignation puts others on alert that certain statements or behaviors are not acceptable around us. We also tend to judge individuals who are not as disciplined or committed to positive behaviors in their lives as we are in our life. The primary indicator of this Mental Body is a sense of discrimination in what is important and what is not. Unless we think it is a priority, we will not take it in or invest in developing new possibilities.

As a Visionary Mental Body, our way to create safety is to have faith in something bigger than ourselves. We learn to respond to others with intuitive insights and understanding of their circumstances without accepting our own. Our need to sacrifice ourselves for some bigger purpose teaches us to grow and adapt even if we do not seem ready for it. The gift is that this forces us to focus on our personal experience and hold all others’ experience at bay. Visionary on the mental body level creates a sense of safety by limiting those things in our lives where we do not have a sense of power or fluidity. Anything which seems like a good idea, gets lost in the need to make it personally relevant to our experience. The problem with this approach is that we can become very narrow and sectarian, particularly when we do not have a diversity of experience. The more we define ourselves in a religious or theologically structured way, the more we naturally reinforce the experiences we have over those we do not. This means we tend to grow to fulfill the expectations of those around us and not necessarily take our self and our larger needs fully into account. Being introduced to a new topic may be like a new doorway opening or a new light being shown in our life because we have a tendency to limit our thinking to those areas that we have internally accepted.

We are unrelenting, idealistic, and unwilling to compromise. We do not give up and do not give in, which allows us to hold on to possibilities and work on manifesting them despite the odds. Instead, we slowly build undeniable associations (about and between what works) that we test by projecting them in the world. What we seek is a reaction from others that can then be directed to serve a new vision. We always seek to push the envelope by making things better. When we dwell on our own experience, we are completely accurate and effective, but capable of gross distortion when dealing with passions of which we have little or no knowledge. We take pieces of what we know and apply the patterns to the world, but find that the world does not respond easily to our suggestions.

We are brilliant when it comes to our internal experience, but lack a clear understanding of how things work external to us, causing a more out of balance effect the further afield we go. We use a clear set of personal experiences to guide our choices that slowly change as we become more aware about energetic differences in the world. The more open we become to ambiguity the less force is needed to initiate growth in the thinking of others. We are shifting from a superficial over-masculine to a more authentic feminine framework. Full of goodness, big-pictured and without the desire to get into the details, we appreciate abstractions that allow us to summarize and synthesize concepts for others. We have a reputation for being one-pointed, repetitive and inflexible thinkers. It is this one-pointed-ness in our mental process that makes others cringe and challenge our point of view.

We tend to internalize our experience so we can see opportunities to transform the experience of others (particularly if that person can see our vision). Everything therefore becomes how to make the transition from an internal framework to an external manifestation of our unity. Our safety is defined by how much we are seen and honored in our independent view of reality. We want others to respect our independence and appreciate our focus, beginning with clean motivations. Anyone who denies the power of love to improve the world or discounts how good intentions and deeds can bring about transformative experiences had better avoid a person with our Mental Body. These things make us feel unsafe. Since we trust intuition with the support of faith and guidance, anyone who denies or discounts inner knowing over outer proof we see as suspect. We also find it difficult to be around overly materialistic individuals who are fixated on the (outer) appearance of things at the cost of inner development and spirit.

While we admire love, we do not trust conditional forms of love and frequently find ourselves trapped in an attempt to prove that we love others when in fact it is an idealization pattern. This means we tend to view love in terms of how much effort others are spending to connect with us rather than focusing on how much we can do to connect to the love within us. Since the source of love is our ability to love ourselves, the more we accept who we are as we are the more effectively we can live up to the ideal of love as existing everywhere around us. We also tend to seek individuals who need us so there is something we contribute to them that helps us build our self esteem and self respect. We want partners who can see our greater purpose and intentions and not get caught up in our self-deprecating patterns where we can become self-critical and self-judgmental.

Because we are not comfortable with our sensations and feelings we tend to define ourselves by how others want us physically, not realizing that this only amplifies our inner pain. The more we have experiences with others where we are not embodying our experience the more we seek traumatic experiences that increase our internal sense of disconnection. We need to break through this log jam by confronting our programmatic attempts to be safe because these experiences are the ones that will hurt us the most. Instead, we need to learn to choose others in a non-instinctive way that is initially discomforting but ultimately, consciousness raising in its effects. This is the best way to unpack the trauma that initially we denied within ourselves.

Attachments to particular principles, loyalties or creeds can also get in the way of our growth. We get comforted by repeating our internal mantras about what we believe, as a way of screening out anything that threatens or challenges us. This includes attachments to groups or people that make us feel safe. We fear to stand out or be made an example to others. Too often, we may have been ridiculed or made fun of because of our differences growing up. The key is not to get caught up in black and white dictums about how things should be. This attachment to a certain belief system minimizes our evolution and keeps us from examining and uplifting our own self-understanding. The key thing to remember is that we need to grow to be happy. Any fixation on an outer form or circumstance may create the illusion of safety but usually prevents us from questioning and clarifying what we know. If we are not willing to grow, the obvious result is a narrowing of our vision which traps us in a world where we constantly beat ourselves down because we are afraid of thinking big. The result is a narrowing of vision and the birth of fanaticism.

We tend to seek feedback in very incremental and limited ways. We over protect whatever we consider critical (particularly our desires) and hide them so no one can use them hurt us. We attempt to build our understanding piece by piece, and want to limit feedback until the past input has been digested. Our smaller focus leads others to believe we are not sufficiently analytical or logical. Because we resist analyzing the big picture, we are sometimes accused of not being able to adapt quickly or reorient ourselves to what is occurring. What we do best is dissect an idea or concept to find its underlying motive or insight. Others react to how volatile our internal creative process is and how little of our process we can share.

We are naturally idealistic and organize options in terms of their benefit and likely outcome within the scope of our intentions. Many consider us overly abstract and principled. Actually, we are not only organized by what we consider high-minded outcomes, but see ourselves as doers, pursuing solutions until we can create the tangible results we seek.

The way we protect ourselves is to ignore anything that does not feel true and right. We try to be the best we can be and ignore the rest. Most of the time, we try to remember what we are devoted to and what we have faith in. However, many times we fall into selfish and jealous love, dependency, gullibility and hyper-intensity when things do not seem to be going right. We can even suppress our instinctive sexual nature if we think it is not for the best. We are about pursuing the right or best thing no matter what the consequences. We minimize any form of emotional expression trying to live a pure and thoughtful life because so many difficulties arise based on feelings and emotions. The goal seems to be to give up or suppress that which seems troublesome. This can lead to self-abasement as a way of regaining our purity, masochism as a way of punishing ourselves and a martyr complex as a way of trying to attain a saintly state. The problem is that all of these aspects deny our humanity and need to make mistakes in order to grow. It also points out to us that the more we repress ourselves in the pursuit of something better, the less likely we are to attain it. What we need to do is to re-examine our choices and reconsider our loyalties based on that, which would assist our growth.

We are brilliant when it comes to our internal experience, but we lack a clear understanding of how things work external to us, causing a more out of balance effect the further a field we go. We use a clear set of personal experiences to guide our choices that slowly change as we become more aware about energetic differences in the world. The more open we become to ambiguity the less force is needed to initiate growth in the thinking of others. This reflects we are shifting from a superficial over-masculine to a more authentic feminine framework. Full of goodness, big-pictured and without the desire to get into the details, we appreciate abstractions that allow us to summarize and synthesize concepts for others. We have a reputation for being one-pointed, repetitive and inflexible thinkers. It is this one-pointed-ness in our mental process that makes others cringe and challenge our point of view.

As individuals with a Tertiary Visionary Intelligence, we tend to internalize our experience so we can see opportunities to transform the experience of others (particularly if that person can see our vision). Everything therefore becomes how to make the transition from an internal framework to an external manifestation of our unity. Our safety is defined by how much we are seen and honored in our independent view of reality. We want others to respect our independence and appreciate our focus, beginning with clean motivations. Anyone who denies the power of love to improve the world or discounts how good intentions and deeds can bring about transformative experiences had better avoid a person with our Tertiary Intelligence. These things make us feel unsafe. Since we trust Intuition with the support of faith and guidance, anyone who denies or discounts inner knowing over outer proof we see as suspect. We also find it difficult to be around overly materialistic individuals who are fixated on the (outer) appearance of things at the cost of inner development and spirit.

While we admire love, we do not trust conditional forms of love and frequently find ourselves trapped in an attempt to prove that we love others when in fact it is an idealization pattern. This means that we tend to view love in terms of how much effort others are spending to connect with us rather than focusing on how much we can do to connect to the love within us. Since the source of love is our ability to love ourselves, the more we accept who we are as we are the more effectively we can live up to the ideal of love as existing everywhere around us. We also tend to seek individuals who need us so there is something we contribute to them that helps us to build our self esteem and self respect. It is for this reason that we want partners who can see our greater purpose and intentions and not get caught up in self-deprecating patterns where we can become self-critical and self-judgmental.

Anyone who denies the power of Intuition for scientific or more concrete ways of understanding is seen as less conscious or unevolved. This reflects our attachment to Intuition as a process of honoring our own life energy. It is interesting to note that frequently we have biases that reflect our attachments to our own emotional well being. When we honor our Emotions as a tool to bring together our Thoughts we transcend the sentimental attachments we have to the shortcuts we adopt. In effect, we become more open to seeing how things work out on a larger level. Unfortunately, before we embrace the larger possibility, there are a lot of ways we try to honor our life energy which have the adverse effect of diminishing it. One of the primary ways is how we seek out excitement when, in fact, excitement is an indication that we are with a person that reflects the most difficult aspects of our parents. We seek out excitement when we do not have a good connection to our Feelings and Sensations. It indicates that we have instinctive life energy repression and we are trying to get some relief by being with individuals that provoke extreme experiences of fear overlapped with the possibility of correcting some past imbalance.

In this last example what we do not realize is that by repressing our own Sensations and Feelings we are in fact denying our embodied experience. As a result, we look to others to break up our inner denial by catalyzing our response to them. Because we are not comfortable with our Sensations and Feelings we tend to define ourselves by how others want us physically, not realizing that this only amplifies our inner pain. In effect, the more we have experiences with others where we are not embodying our experiences the more we seek out traumatic experiences that increase our internal sense of disconnection. Our Visionary Tertiary Intelligence needs to break through this log jam by confronting our programmatic attempts to be safe because these experiences are the ones that will hurt us the most. Instead, we need to learn to choose others in a non-instinctive way that are initially discomforting but ultimately, consciousness-raising in their effects. This is the best way to unpack the trauma that initially we denied within ourselves.

Attachments to particular principles, loyalties or creeds can also get in the way of our growth. A lot of times we get comforted by repeating our internal mantras about what we believe as a way of screening out anything that threatens or challenges us. This includes attachments to groups or people that make us feel safe. This process reflects the fear that we do not want to stand out or be made an example to others. Too often, we may have been ridiculed or made fun of because of our differences growing up. The key is not to get caught up in black and white dictums about how things should be. This attachment to a certain belief system minimizes our evolution and keeps us from examining and uplifting our own self-understanding. The key thing to remember is that we need to grow to be happy.

Any fixation on an outer form or circumstance may create the illusion of safety but usually prevents us from questioning and clarifying what we know. If we are not willing to grow, the obvious result is a narrowing of our vision that traps us in a world where we constantly beat ourselves down because we are afraid of thinking big. The result is a narrowing of vision and the birth of fanaticism.

Our Visionary Mental Body Intelligence tends to seek feedback in very incremental and limited ways. We over protect whatever we consider critical (particularly our desires) and hide them so that no one can hurt us easily. We attempt to build our understanding piece by piece, which is why we want to limit feedback until the past input has been digested. Our smaller focus leads other Intelligences to believe we are not sufficiently analytical or logical. Because we resist analyzing the big picture, we are sometimes accused (by other Intelligences) of not being able to adapt quickly or reorient ourselves to what is occurring. What we do best is dissect an idea or concept to find its underlying motive or insight. Others react to how volatile our internal creative process is and how little of our process we can share. Our Intelligence is distinguished by our mental ardor, devotion, and desire for manifesting solutions that contribute to the world.

While we are (eventually) considered completely intuitive, initially (since it is not easily quantifiable or predictive) others may see us as non-linear and non-rational in nature. We have a very narrow focus on how we grow and achieve our goals. This mental vision embraces the whole picture, but may not include all the aspects necessary to actually manifest its vision. This is why so many of us find ourselves categorized as ethereal or hard to pin down, even though we are quite clear about what we are committed to. Another gift of the Visionary Tertiary is that we are passionately clear and direct about what we believe, so much so that we become confused if others do not articulate their views in a similar way. This can lead to bouts of pessimism and hopelessness when we become frustrated by the inability of others to work with us.

The will of the Visionary is almost the same as the Orchestrating Intelligence. The main difference is that Visionary Intelligence is not so much interested in operational thinking, but in completing a thought process in a way that leaves a clear, uplifting imprint for others to follow. The other difference is that Visionary Intelligence is actually the feminine perspective, while the Orchestrating is masculine. We lay the mental track for others to follow. Our ability to be brief and to the point makes us seem like Orchestrating Intelligence, but what differentiates us is the capacity to endlessly repeat and reinforce ourselves, which makes it difficult to change direction once a path is chosen. We are naturally idealistic and organize options in terms of our benefit and likely outcome within the scope of our intentions. Many consider us to be overly abstract and principled. Actually, we are not only organized by what we consider high-minded outcomes, but we see ourselves as doers, pursuing solutions until we can create the tangible results we seek.

We are naturally idealistic and organize options in terms of their benefit and likely outcome within the scope of our intentions. Many consider us overly abstract and principled. Actually, we are not only organized by what we consider high-minded outcomes, but we see ourselves as doers, pursuing solutions until we can create the tangible results they seek.

Our Visionary type of Intelligence goes through three stages of development. We emphasize our physical Aliveness and capacity to manifest what we desire. This expression is focused primarily on Intent and how this intent matches the results we produce. Getting past this stage requires the ability to go beyond tried and true mental approaches that repeat old patterns. Until we escape this conservative mindset of repeating the past, we cannot really begin to engage our creative capacity.

The second level of development is where the blinding light of our eyes shows forth, which shows where we are beginning to use Thoughts to awaken the knowing of others. This indicates that we have come to a single-mindedness of purpose that can be focused on others. This is a personality-based, security-conscious belief in our rightness. (Unless we come to understand the downside of confronting and putting others on the defensive, which reduces our effectiveness, we do not evolve beyond this stage.) Our need to identify with our Thoughts and take credit for how we push things forward interferes with our natural desire to operate freely with others.

By practicing restraint, the third level emerges, which is where we start seeing the wholeness of ourselves as part of the group and begin to unify others through emotional perceptivity. The transpersonal power of the group calls forth the Intelligence needed to solve the group’s problems. In this way, we find our full blossoming in helping to anchor the reality of others as to what the group knows and wishes to accomplish together. We develop more concretely in terms of Thoughts and then slowly expand to body Sensations and Emotions. We are naturally Convergent and doggedly incremental in our decision-making style.

The way we protect ourselves when we have Visionary Mental Body Intelligence is to ignore anything that does not feel true and right. This means we try to be the best we can be and ignore the rest. Most of the time, we try to remember what we are devoted to and what we have faith in. Many times we fall into selfish and jealous love, dependency, gullibility and hyper-intensity when things do not seem to going right. We can even suppress our instinctive sexual nature if we think it is not for the best. The Visionary Intelligence on the Mental Body is about pursuing the right or best thing no matter what the consequences. It minimizes any form of emotional expression trying to live a pure and thoughtful life.

This is because so many difficulties arise based on Feelings and Emotions. The goal seems to be to give up or suppress that which seems troublesome. This can lead to self-abasement as a way of regaining our purity, masochism as a way of punishing ourselves and a martyr complex as a way of trying to attain a saintly state. The problem is that all of these aspects deny our humanity and need to make mistakes in order to grow. It also points out to us that the more we repress ourselves in the pursuit of something better, the less likely we are to attain it. What we need to do is to re-examine our choices and reconsider our loyalties based on that, which would assist our growth.

As parents, we focus on the motivation our children have to engage life. We believe that if they have the best motivations, everything will work out. Unfortunately, this orientation is not always one that children can understand. While we believe that devotion, charity, and humility are great characteristics for children to embody, many children cannot or will not live up to these possibilities. The main distinction is that a Visionary Mental Body parent's focus on the experience of love and how we show compassion. Orchestrating, Investigative, Intentional and Patterning Intelligence Mental Body children will not respond to this approach, because they will need to express their will in ways that are motivationally limited and learn from their mistakes. Only children with Compassionate, Inventive and Visionary Intelligence Mental Bodies will easily respond to a motivational calibration process that we, as parents, hold dear. We want our children to develop their passion and bliss and higher motivation seems to be the best way to get there. Other children need to start with the lowest motives and work their way up so they can experience problems. The issue is that we can feel like failures, because we did not teach our child to avoid these negative expressions. This difference in viewpoint can cause great schisms between the child and us, as parents.

When we operate from this Mental Body we focus on the motivation our children have with which to engage life. We believe that if they have the best motivations, everything will work out. Unfortunately, this orientation is not always one children can understand. While we believe devotion, charity, and humility are great characteristics for children to embody, many children cannot or will not live up to these possibilities. It is important to remember that children need to be children and that any imposition of expectations upon them can have either a positive or negative effect. What we want to accomplish as parents is to recognize what the child’s need is for structure and provide it to the degree that they need it. The main distinction is that Visionary Mental Body parents focus on the experience of passion and believe they alone possess the key insights necessary to empower their child’s growth. While this can be true, it is also self limiting to not allow other teachers or authority figures contribute to the child in the same way the parent does. What the children learn is how to meet the expectations of their parents and not question their commands in front of others. Sometimes this expands into “Children are to be seen and not heard”. The core issue is that a child learns to pay attention to what their mother says and do it without argument.

It is this Mental Body that is most commonly adopted in the United States as the model for “parental goodness”. The core intention is that we want our children to perform to the best of their ability and are unwilling to have them do anything less. A part of how this is accomplished is the parent’s constant belief that the child can do anything. This exaggerated sense of possibilities is picked up by the child and is the largest cause of children not possessing a realistic understanding of what they are getting into. In surveys among children, comparing their expectations to their actual grades only in the United States are children who are performing poorly do they have the expectations that they can easily catch up and succeed. This over confidence is particularly scary in areas of Math and Science where we as a country have been under performing for some time. Orchestrator, Implementer, Investigator and Storyteller children will not respond to this approach, because they will need to express their will in ways that are motivationally limited and learn from their mistakes. Only children with Compassionate, Inventive and Visionary Intelligence will respond to a motivational process that we, as parents, hold dear.

We want our children to develop their passion and bliss, higher motivation seems to be the best way to get there. Other children need to start with the lowest motives and work their way up to experience how to take problems and turn them into possibilities. The issue is that we can feel like failures, because we did not teach our child to avoid these negative expressions. This difference in viewpoint can cause great schisms between the child and us, as parents. Other problems occur between the child’s and the parent’s expectations. When they are vastly different, it usually leads to these types of parents attempting to force their views upon the child. This usually occurs by limiting how a child spends his time and forcing him to do what is expected. This approach works best for Visionary children. It is problematic for Inventor, Storyteller and Implementer children. While Compassionate children go along with this process, later in life they need to recover the power to chose for themselves what is appropriate.

Patterning Intelligence Tertiary Mental Body Expression

(formerly known as Sage, Pattern Recognition or Ray 7)

Known for entertaining others. We protect ourselves as Storyteller Mental Bodies by coming up with practices that help us connect with others. These practices (like entertaining) distract us from our own self consciousness (where others expect something from us). The greater the number of friends we have in our life, the greater the self-perceived richness of our life. This means we use our observational skills to learn how to tune into others so that we make friends easily. If this is not safe, then much of our early childhood development will be in vain. What we need to do in order to grow is recognize differences and respond to them. While this can be seen as always being able to talk our way out of a problem, the real benefit is that we begin to learn how to distinguish what others need from what we need. This is why when we are put on the spot, we always have something to say that either makes fun of the situation or puts the spotlight on how our needs are nothing compared to someone else’s needs in that moment.

Storyteller Mental Body individuals see ourselves as communicators who help others get what they want. Whenever others are uncomfortable or have anxieties, we feel compelled to speak from our own experience about the meaning of the issue. Our goal is to talk about things so others will accept themselves more. The problem is that we frequently lose ourselves in these attempts and don’t express our own truth in the situation. We also get caught up in entertaining others believing that being the center of attention in social situations can lead to greater social acceptance. Unfortunately, when we get overly involved in being an entertainer we tend to say things without thinking them through and it can lead to saying things that are offensive. We choose this Mental Body to be able to talk our way out of problems because we tend to be mischievous. We make light of heavy repressive behavior and/or Imprinting. A lot of times we become our own entertainment system because no one in the family is fun or interesting, and we don’t like to be bored. We attempt to bring the family together into some kind of activity so they need to participate together, in order to learn to get along. If the family cannot accomplish this, then we distract ourselves by doing it with other groups.

We protect ourselves by coming up with practices that help us connect with others. The greater the number of friends we have in our life, the greater the self-perceived richness of our life. This means we use our observational skills to learn how to tune into others so we make friends easily. If this is not safe, much of our early childhood development will be in vain. What we need to do in order to grow is recognize differences and respond to them. While this can be seen as always being able to talk our way out of a problem, the real benefit is that we begin to learn how to distinguish what others need from what we need. This is why when we are put on the spot, we always have something to say that either makes fun of the situation or puts the spotlight on how our needs are nothing compared to someone else’s in that moment. We instinctively protect ourselves by trying to talk ourselves out of any problem with others or distract them by being entertaining or funny.

We use a detailed, constructive and imitative thought process which allows us to materialize and manifest whatever we think. Like the Implementer and Investigator Mental Bodies, we are good at organizing, sorting, and classifying whatever shows up. We have a highly accurate mental process and delineated thinking that reflects internal templates we use in many ways. Our gift is the ability to coordinate and synthesize activities so group processes are well served. While others may be dismayed by the conformity, standardization and inflexibility in larger projects, it is our mental consistency that makes us powerful at implementing tasks. Many interpret our formality, such as building routines and implementing systematic solutions, as our mental gift, when actually, it is the energetic precipitation of unified thought that serves the group purpose. This is what makes us unique.

Like Inventors, we seek to bring order to any situation. Dissimilar to the Inventors who work from the top down, we work from the bottom up. This reflects the focus placed on using physical form to establish right relationship. We seek the functional usefulness of any pattern, idea or motive so we can relate it to other opportunities that emerge. Compared to Inventors, we seek greater conformity. We also appreciate the timing and sequencing of events. This conformity emphasizes the natural roles and structures of what people have in common, rather than the individualistic focus.

When we are not clear about how to see and use patterns, it is easy to become enamored with the patterns of others. What we eventually need to do is discover the inherent patterns in peoples’ behavior and distinguish this from what we were taught to do. Until we do so, we are caught up in games where we manipulate others for our own gain. Of course, there are those of us who rebel against these rules in general because they are based on the past. In such circumstances, we constantly seek out what is natural versus what is prescribed. In this way we try to learn how to respond rather than react. Ultimately, we learn how to listen to others and then we can engage each individual uniquely. Simultaneously, we discover what works for us and how to honor the needs of others along with our own.

Storyteller Mental Body individuals tend to externalize consciousness in terms of a group activity so we can experience our own power. Anything that opposes this scares us. Everything therefore becomes how to see the greatness in each member of the group and orchestrate their participation in such a way as to maximize everyone’s creative contribution. Anyone who discounts the power of humanity to learn from its mistakes, uses humor to put others down, or uses communication to distance themselves from others is seen as unsafe and untrustworthy. This is because we honor communication and laughter as ways to unify us with others. The core issue for us is being able to use our voice to express our truth and be heard by others. Anyone who does not listen and either inhibits our speaking or the speech of others scares us and we either ignore them or leave their vicinity forever. Ironically, we can get into judgments about the physical fitness of others when, in fact, we may not be physically fit ourselves. This is because the more we repress our feelings, the more judgmental we are about our physical well being.

One of the challenges is that we can become enamored of how we look or how we feel about how we look. This vanity comes about because one, we feel we need to prove ourselves through having an affirmative gender identity attractiveness. Because we are able to be so androgynous, we counteract this ability pushing our gender identity to be an affirmative image that others want and/or adore and two, we easily fixate on the power of our body to convey a sense of aliveness so others will react to us. This is particularly true when we idealize our animalistic nature to survive and succeed despite adversity. When we believe that we can overcome the rejection of others and get what we want, it promotes an instinctive connection that dominates all other levels of us. Some individuals around us see this as a sense of confidence and power. Others see it as seductive and mysterious which most of the time is used to be sexually sophisticated. The more we are anchored in this way, the more likely we become burned out and jaded over time when we do not find equal partners with whom we can interact.

Energetically, Storytellers ground our Thoughts with our Feelings at 50% and 30%, respectively. This means that our Emotions and Feelings occur at 10% each. Thus, we are similar to the Momentum Intelligence individuals except with reverse priorities. The major difference between the Patterning Intelligence and Investigative Intelligence is less focus on concrete Thoughts and a complete redirection of additional thought energy into Sensations. This focuses us on how to direct, control and manipulate matter itself. Our truth comes from sensing how energetic patterns will play out in any group or personal expression. If we deny our ability to read patterns, we cut ourselves off from our enjoyment of being with people and operating in groups to amplify the contribution of others. We instinctively protect ourselves by trying to talk ourselves out of any problem with others or distract them by being entertaining or funny.

We have a detailed, constructive and imitative thought process that allows us to materialize and manifest whatever we think. Like the Intentional and Investigative Intelligence, we are good at organizing, sorting and classifying whatever shows up. We have a highly accurate mental process and delineated thinking that reflects internal templates we use in many ways. Our gift is the ability to coordinate and synthesize activities so that group processes are well served. We expand or explode imbalances and obstructions in Context (similar to the Inventive Intelligence), releasing Awareness and Love. We are called the Patterning Intelligence, because we recognize patterns and organize the Feelings and Thoughts in a group and bring them into alignment, so people know their purpose and place in the group. We anchor ourselves at the base of the spine and gradually resonate upwards to bring order and structure to the world. In this way, we start our process with physical activities, Emotions, Thoughts and Intuition, although in many situations, the reverse order is seen.

We build our knowing from heart energy, which makes us powerful manifestors, even in our early stages of development. One downside is that we get caught up following particular methodologies that can limit our natural experimentation and fluidity with people. We can get caught up in what is proper or appropriate and operate in extremely ritualized ways. This means that we are sensitive to patterns of behavior and the rules of law, because we believe in the sense of order that comes from knowing the next step in a sequence. While we use logic and reason to make decisions, we also get caught up in conformity and habitual patterns of behavior that limit creativity and flexibility. While we can be detail-minded, we are more likely to be powerful organizers of people and tasks, which can drive us to coordinate and synthesize what is necessary to move forward (without necessarily enjoying it).

While we Patterning Intelligence individuals, or Storytellers, enjoy methodical analysis, we like to achieve the proper arrangement of what we know rather than investigate something new. This means we do not investigate something because it is new, but because we want to know how it fits in with everything else. The preeminent characteristic of a Storyteller is that we are thought builders who systematically work through Thoughts and sort them into categories that can be arrayed in systematic hierarchies. If a system does not work, we have infinite patience to dissect the elements and reorder them into an appropriate alignment. We learn best in groups and inherently build internal wisdom by simplifying our experiences into clear affirmations and formulas, which we tend to repeat.

While others may be dismayed by the conformity, standardization and inflexibility in larger projects, it is our mental consistency that makes us powerful at implementing these tasks. Many interpret our formality, such as building routines and implementing systematic solutions, as our mental gift, when, actually, it is the energetic precipitation of unified thought that serves the group purpose. This is what makes us unique. Deeper observation reveals the inner rhythm and spiral-cyclic re-examination of each level of knowing that insures everything is being taken into consideration. The ability to pattern our Intelligence is what empowers Patterning thinking.

Like the Inventive Intelligence, we seek to bring order to any situation. While the Inventive Intelligence works from the top down, we work from the bottom up. This reflects the focus placed on using physical form to establish right relationship. Our Patterning Intelligence seeks the functional usefulness of any pattern, idea or motive so we can effectively relate it to other opportunities that emerge. Compared to the Inventive Intelligence, we seek greater conformity. We also appreciate the timing and sequencing of events more than the Inventive Intelligence. This conformity emphasizes the natural roles and structures of what people have in common, rather than the individualistic focus of the Inventive Intelligence (which focuses on differences).

Some examples of this can be seen in Higher Alignment work, where the patterns of communication, decision-making or Creative Expressions have been diagrammed in elaborate detail. The challenge for us Patterning Intelligence individuals is that those without this Intelligence have difficulty knowing what to make of the symbolic representations. In short, the map is not the territory.

When we are using our Patterning Intelligence Tertiary to protect ourselves it usually results in greater formalism, ritualism, concern with rules, regulations and the proper use of etiquette. When we are not clear about how to see and use patterns, it is easy to become enamored by the patterns of others. What we eventually need to do is to discover the inherent patterns in peoples’ behavior and distinguish this from what we were taught to do. Until we do so, we are caught up in games where we manipulate others for our own gain. Of course, there are those of us who rebel against these rules in general because they are based on the past. In such circumstances, we constantly seek out what is natural versus what is prescribed. In this way we try to learn how to respond rather than react. Ultimately, we learn how to listen to others and then we can engage each individual uniquely. Simultaneously, we discover what works for us and how to honor the needs of others along with our own.

We can recognize the importance of Patterning Intelligence by how we overdo, under-do or react to it. When we overdo our Tertiary Intelligence, we become perfectionist, dogmatic and predictable. When we under-do this Intelligence, we become habitual, ritualistic and afraid to take risks. When overwhelmed and/or discounted by individuals who do not accept us (particularly when we recognize something they do not want us to know), we become extremely careful and overly formal in how we act, think and speak. It is interesting to note that while we can be detailed, we do not want to get lost in the details. When we are hurt, we become detail oriented to protect ourselves.

As an individual with a Tertiary Patterning Intelligence we tend to externalize our consciousness in terms of a group activity so that we can experience our own power. Anything that opposes this scares us. Everything, therefore, becomes how to see the greatness in each member of the group and orchestrate their participation in such a way as to maximize everyone’s creative contribution. Any person who discounts the power of humanity to learn from its mistakes, uses humor to put others down, or uses communication to distance themselves from others is seen as unsafe and untrustworthy. This is because we honor communication and laughter as ways to unify us with others. The core issue for us is being able to use our voice to express our truth and be heard by others. Anyone who does not listen and either inhibits our speaking or the speech of others scares us and we either ignore them or leave their vicinity forever. Ironically, we can get into judgments about the physical fitness of others when, in fact, we may not be physically fit ourselves. This is because the more repressed we are in our Feelings, the more judgmental we are about our physical well being.

Since our energy sees all incremental change as the fulfillment of Creative patterns, we are repulsed by anyone denying their nature or acting out a role, which does not serve them. We have many experiences where we deny our own authentic expression and this bothers us enormously. Individuals who act on blind faith without anything to substantiate their trust also repel us. This is because we trust that there is a science to our instinctive knowing and we do not understand how others who are disconnected from their body can actually know anything. Selfish or jealous love is repugnant because it reveals the insincerity and lack of authentic love. Anyone who uses domination and blanket destructiveness without having a better plan or way of improving the situation is seen as egotistical and self-absorbed. Those who are intolerant to what is new or has an unwillingness to evolve with the group to find the best solution is seen as an obstacle to group development. What an individual with our Intelligence trusts is the magic of people, which creates a spark igniting group passion. Anyone who is opposed to this had better get out of the way of our expression. We seek to bring out the Creative Gifts of the group so the best of some individuals stimulates the best in others, eliminating control and suppression, which we hate.

One of the challenges of being a Tertiary Storyteller, is that we can become enamored of how we look or how we feel about how we look. This vanity comes about because of two factors. One, we feel we need to prove ourselves through having an affirmative gender identity attractiveness. Because we are able to be so androgynous, we counteract this ability by attempting to push our gender identity to be an affirmative image that others want and/or adore. Secondly, our Intelligence is easily fixated on the power of our body to convey the sense of Aliveness so that others will react to us. This is particularly true when we idealize our animalistic nature to survive and succeed despite adversity. When we believe that we can overcome the rejection of others and get what we want, it promotes an instinctive connection that predominates all other levels of us. Some individuals around us see this as a sense of confidence and power. Others see it as seductive and mysterious which most of the time is used to be sexually sophisticated. The more we are anchored this way, the more likely we become more burned out and jaded over time when we do not find equal partners with whom we can interact. Eventually, we need to learn how to uplift this energy so that our life energy mixes with Light to become Love.

As parents, we find our expression in certain family practices, which promote group well-being and closeness. Safety is created by having pre-established ways to communicate our fears, concerns or mistakes without being judged or automatically being made wrong. We attempt to work out rituals, where our children can confess their mistakes and aspire to something better. The key issue is that we do not believe that all children will communicate, when given the space to do so. Not only do some children not communicate verbally, but it is also possible that if we attempt to speak about something before the child knows what their truth is, it may be detrimental to their growth. This occurs because we assume that since expressing ourselves helps to clarify our truth that this same approach will work for others, which may not be the case. Another aspect of this situation is that as parents we try to accommodate the differences in children and eventually do work out what is successful for each child. The time required to do this is completely dependent on our consciousness and our child and how much we are motivated to grow together.

When we operate from this Mental Body we find our expression in certain family practices which promote group well-being and closeness. While we as parents have a particular way of contributing, it is also how our children contribute to us that weaves the family dynamic into a particular pattern. More than any other Mental Body, we wish to be more inclusive in finding ways of being that work for us while also working for our children. We want to do this in an easy-going, loving way without a lot of turbulence, or drama. Some would say that more than anything we are attempting to find the flow in the family dynamic and keep things evolving through time. Safety is created by having pre-established ways to communicate our fears, concerns, or mistakes without being judged or being made wrong. Similar to Inventor Mental Body parents we want things to be fun and interesting. More than Inventor Mental Body parents, we seek mutual conversation so all the options can be explored which leads us as parents able to make the best choice.

While it may appear that we have the foundation of a democracy, we perceive that we are the final arbiters of what goes on in the family. We attempt to work out rituals or learning activities where our children can confess their mistakes and aspire to something better. The key issue is that we do not believe all children will communicate, when given the space to do so. This bugs us because we believe full communication is essential to family life. The more a child refuses to participate the more we take it as a personal affront. Not only do some children not communicate verbally, but it’s also possible that if we attempt to speak about something before the child knows what their truth is, it may be detrimental to their growth. The means as parents we have to learn an elaborate sense of timing. Like all great comedians, we have to wait for the right moment because we assume that since expressing ourselves helps to clarify our truth that this same approach will work for others, which may not be the case. Inventor children are the most difficult to get to communicate before they are ready. Therefore, we must be patient and invite them to participate in their own way and at their own time. Another aspect of this situation is that as parents we try to accommodate the differences in children and eventually do work out what is successful for each child. The time required is completely dependent on our consciousness and our child and how much we are motivated to grow together.

What we most seek is to be influential with our children, without being overwhelming. While we do focus on supporting them in their activities, we leave the choice of these activities up to them. The one area where we do force some stylized participation is around events where the community is involved and will make judgments if our children are acting out of line. More than any other Mental Body, we emphasize social appropriateness and grace in our children. We expect our children to act civilly and with restraint and not draw negative attention to the family. The children, realizing this, sometimes act out in ways to express their displeasure at some aspect of our concrete expectations. Like the Visionary Mental Body we tend to impose consequences on bad behavior. Unlike the Visionary Mental Body, we apply style points where children earn back credit for acting with dignity and class. What we love is witty repartee, appropriate entertainment capabilities (comedy, music or singing) and storytelling. This works best with Storyteller, Compassionate and Inventor children. We often run into difficulties with Implementer, Orchestrator and Investigator children. Visionary children are the most indeterminate and hard to predict.

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© Copyright 2016, Larry Byram. All Rights Reserved.

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