Intentional Intelligence Tertiary Mental Body Expression

(formerly known as Warrior, Body Wisdom or Ray 3)

Known as a provider for others. As an Intentional Intelligence Tertiary, our safety is guaranteed by being both physically fit and attentive to what is going on around us. Our objective is to maintain a state of alertness, so no one can take advantage of us. We establish safety zones around us in various ways. In cars and houses, we have keys that help us to control access. In physical proximity to others, we make ongoing assessments about how we will protect ourselves if the need arises. The key issue is that continuity and an ongoing physical presence allows us to build a state of trust with others. Part of our internal safety network is also where we work, play and relax in our life. We use physical objects and familiar locations to anchor our safety and security. These anchors, in addition to our friends, family and partners, make it possible to operate confidently in any situation or circumstance. Martial arts or other forms of self-defense can also prepare us to confront our fears. What we learn to do is to trust our Sensations and instinctive impulses so any issues are quickly noticed. 

Implementer Mental Bodies are ideal for those who do not want to get overly connected or committed in our participation with others. Implementer Mental Bodies are more isolated and often we are lost in our thoughts of how we will improve the current situation. We believe that more interaction does not generate correspondingly more action. Our goal, therefore, is to balance our understanding of the circumstances against how much we think a particular improvement will generate either time or energy savings. The tradeoffs are carefully made so we are not overwhelmed by others attempting to make things better. We also seek time to figure out what processes will work better for them and which routines we need to stabilize our production. It is good for us, when growing up, to have martial arts or team sports experiences where we can implement strategies and explore options. Otherwise, it takes us a long time to find jobs where these types of tradeoffs are analyzed. With this experience, we find our niche more quickly.

As an Implementer Mental Body, our safety is guaranteed by being both physically fit and attentive to what is going on around us. Our objective is to maintain a state of alertness so no one can take advantage of us. We establish safety zones around ourselves in various ways. In cars and houses, we have keys that help us to control access. In physical proximity to others, we make ongoing assessments about how we will protect ourselves if the need arises. The key issue is that continuity and an ongoing physical presence allows us to build a state of trust with others. Part of our internal safety network is also where we work, play, and relax in our life. We use physical objects and familiar locations to anchor our safety and security. These anchors, in addition to our friends, family, and partners, make it possible to operate confidently in any situation or circumstance. Martial arts or other forms of self-defense can also prepare us to confront our fears. What we learn to do is trust our sensations and instinctive impulses so any issues are quickly noticed.

Strength comes from honoring our internal sense of timing and trusting our ability to instinctively act and react without preemptively needing to know what is going on. If we cut ourselves off from our passions by denying our emotional experience, it is difficult, if not impossible to grow. What maintains us is a sense of duty and loyalty to be in the service to others we love. Without these elements being active in our life, we are doomed to the unconscious use of brute force where our natural strategy and tactics will not fully emerge. We instinctively protect ourselves by acting dull and dim-witted so others will underestimate our insightfulness and capacity to produce.

Implementer Mental Body individuals have both tactical and strategic levels. On a tactical level, we like to find the most efficient way to do things and then implement them. On a strategic level, we like to plan how our contribution can be received by others around us. Our capacity to consider options and manage resources can be used to manipulate circumstances and people to fulfill our goals. We like to consider every variable and test it to see what the outcomes would be in any situation. The key quality, which defines this mental process, is that we are internally assessing the results of these experiments, which we are then able to summarize on the spot for others. This assures others that we somehow have our finger on the pulse of any activity and know what is going on, despite appearances to the contrary. We are useful in real time sports activities, business production processes, or strategic business planning operations and organizational leadership. One of the key identifying factors is our desire not to say much or reveal too much of our internal processes for fear others will judge us, because we lack an ability to explain our reasoning well. What compensates for this reluctance is an ability to trust our body sensations and get to the gut level right answer before anyone else does. Another indication is a fixation on what we know even though we may not have the evidence to back it up.

We are able to determine that the degree of resistance in any particular activity can be clarified by the degree of resistance in oneself about that activity. This is what leads the body to innately trust or distrust any particular process based on its defined outcome. We possess a directness and unwillingness to shade the truth or play political games to make things seem more acceptable. As we evolve, we develop more levels of complexity and resilience. In this way we move from a narrow understanding to a relatively broad way of responding physically. The speed of response becomes quicker as the clarity of what works is reinforced. We always operate at the same speed but over time, we build shortcuts, because we recognize in which situations we can cut through the noise and address the core problem, which is our safety. We possess a physical rigidity or tension where we maintain a sense of endurance. When our energy does decline, we are unable to formulate or express clear thoughts.

What others do not understand is that we commonly pretend confusion or plead complexity when we do not understand the operating parameters of a particular assessment or project. What this means is that we need to examine the methods of a project before we comment. In effect, we need to internalize it in our bodies so we can predict the outcomes or potential benefits of a particular process. For some individuals this means sleeping on the process to get a lock on how it actually works particularly when there is an existing model we can study. When a situation or process is only described intellectually, our capacity to understand and replicate it is limited. One other key element is that the more a solution is turned into a practical artifact, the deeper capacity there is to amplify or improve the design by internally modeling it. We have a physical component of our self-expression that can deepen our internal understanding of any outer process. It also suggests that any repetitive physical motion can help deepen our concentration when we focus on an area of interest.

Another side of our process is in the pursuit of answers. Compared to all the other energies, we are the most flexible in creating answers. As long as the solution is effective, the particular process does not matter to us. The only limit to our flexibility is our struggle to make sure that a process maintains the standard or quality that we have come to expect. We are known for our ability to systematically search through different alternatives and eliminate those that do not hold promise. While we pay attention to the details, we also tend to disregard them when they do not seem to have necessary relevance. We can simultaneously explore options, analyze them, and quantify each option’s merits independently.

Our kind of matrix thinking is called concatenation.  We analyze data at the same time we are developing preliminary conclusions. Concatenation is the ability to analyze results based on incremental change in variables or input. We optimize the end result based on knowing exactly what is needed and when it is needed. We are highly deductive and skilled at identifying likely problems in any process. We are incessantly active, manipulative (in an analytical way), and quantifying so choices can be made backed up by scientific assessments. It is important to note that we can be scientific but feel that the science can be overdone and, therefore, we prefer simple solutions. Others typically see us as difficult, but brilliant, eclectic, and penetrating in our analyses. Over time we develop both tactical and strategic perceptions, which, given the proper circumstances, can be acted on immediately. We also work well on brainstorming non-linear abstract problem solving.

We tend to focus on sensations and activity as the primary way to express our Self. Everything therefore becomes how to fit into the structure of what we seek to accomplish. Any individual who discounts effort or denies the value of hard work and does not respect the tactics or strategy of excellence in action had better stay away from us for we have little tolerance for them. We tend to trust only people who are consistent in their word and who are simple in their needs. Anyone who is too complicated or demanding emotionally is moved to the back of the line. We also do not trust individuals who are overly adaptive, seductive or chameleon-like (Inventors). We react to those who have no sense of virtue or loyalty (in our way).

While we admire passion, we do not equate emotional sentimentality with positive expression. We are particularly concerned about others with extreme anxiety, worry or excessive moodiness. It is a warning to us when others exaggerate who they are or are overeager for compromise. We believe any unregulated passion (such as indolence, unreliability, procrastination or self-absorption in suffering) is a character flaw. While it may be a complementary self perspective, we do not like excessive objectivity or unrelenting rationalism without it being based upon some kind of sensory input. Anyone who is hyper-idealistic or in any way impractical in the pursuit of their goals will find it difficult to connect with us. We have particular difficulty with anyone who acts like a martyr when they are not willing to let things occur that would minimize their martyrdom.

We tend to idealize the strength of our bodies believing that our robust appearance will intimidate others. In any physical activity we expect others to defer to us not just because we are physically strong but we are the most effective both tactically and strategically in getting things done. This physical self confidence is also based on the ability to get our needs met. In relationships this shows up as others appreciating our strength and commitment to full, uncensored animalistic expression. The problem with this is that others can sometimes get exhausted and wonder if our fixation on our physical form has become an expression of our materialistic and selfish self expression. This is because we may use our physical expression to distract others from meeting us in a spiritual way. Our partners might seek a greater appreciation for our intellectual, emotional and intuitive sensibilities.

Energetically, we are focused on Sensations, which reflect 60% of our Implementer energy. Thoughts, which compose 30% of our energy, reflect and inform our Sensations. Like Compassionate Intelligence individuals, we use our Emotions (the remaining 10%) to focus and drive desire into form. Our Intentional Intelligence is composed of three major factors of which Sensations are predominant; this means building momentum is critical for us to stabilize our thought process. Strength comes from honoring our internal sense of timing and trusting our ability to instinctively act and react without preemptively needing to know what is going on. If we cut ourselves off from our passions by denying our emotional experience, it is difficult, if not impossible to grow in our Intentional Intelligence. What maintains our Intentional Intelligence is a sense of duty and loyalty to be in the service to others we love. Without these elements being active in our life, we are doomed to the unconscious use of brute force, where our natural strategy and tactics will not fully emerge. We instinctively protect ourselves by acting dull and dim-witted so that others will underestimate our insightfulness and capacity to produce. 

Our Intentional Intelligence has both a tactical and strategic level. On a tactical level, we like to find the most efficient way to accomplish things and then implement them. On a strategic level, we like to plan how our contribution can be received by others around us. Our capacity to consider options and manage resources can be used to manipulate circumstances and people to fulfill our goals. We like to consider every variable and test it to see what the outcomes would be in any situation. The key quality which defines this mental process, is that we are internally assessing the results of these experiments, which we are then able to summarize on the spot for others. This assures others that we somehow have our finger on the pulse of any activity and know what is going on, despite appearances to the contrary.

We are useful in real time sports activities, business production processes, or strategic business planning operations and organizational leadership. One of the key identifying factors is our desire not to say much or reveal too much of our internal processes for fear others will judge us, because we lack an ability to explain our reasoning well. What compensates for our reluctance is an ability to trust our body Sensations and get to the gut level, right answer before anyone else does. Another indication is a fixation on what we do know, even though we may not have the evidence to back it up. Like the Orchestrating Intelligence, our Intentional Intelligence is based on an even more physical assessment of the situation. We are able to determine that the degree of resistance in any particular activity can be clarified by the degree of resistance in our self about that activity.

This is what leads our body to innately trust or distrust any particular process based on a defined outcome. Another indication of our Intelligence is the amount of directness and unwillingness to shade the truth or play political games to make things seem more acceptable. As we evolve, we develop more levels of complexity and resilience. In this way we move from a narrow understanding to a relatively broad way of responding physically. The speed of our response becomes quicker as the clarity of what works is reinforced. It is important to recognize that we always operate at the same speed but with time, we build shortcuts, because we recognize with which situations we can cut through the noise and address the core problem, which is promotes our safety. We possess a physical rigidity or tension, which maintains our endurance. When our energy does decline, we are unable to formulate or clearly express our Thoughts. 

What others do not understand is that we commonly pretend confusion or plead complexity when we do not understand the operating parameters of a particular assessment or project. What this means is that we need to examine the methodologies of a project before we comment on it. In effect, we have to internalize it in our bodies so that we can predict the outcomes or potential benefits of a particular process. For some Intentional Tertiary Intelligence individuals this means sleeping on the process so we can get a lock on how it actually works. This occurs when there is an existing model we can study. When a situation or process is only described intellectually, our capacity to understand and replicate it is limited. Another key element is that the more a solution is turned into a practical artifact, the deeper capacity there is to amplify or improve the existing design by internally modeling it. This reflects that there is a physical component to our self-expression that can deepen our internal understanding of any outer process. It also suggests that any repetitive physical motion can help to deepen our concentration when we focus on any area of interest. 

Our Intelligence is based on the consistent and systematic organization of Life Energy. We use rotary motion to operate in predictable and empowering ways. We always reach for that which is beyond our current understanding by doing something new. We expand or explode obstructions in Intent (similar to Orchestrating Intelligence), releasing Life energy in order to build momentum. Metaphorically, we represent the return of the prodigal son, because we slowly find our way to more powerful options. While we are slow (like a turtle), we are extremely capable and consistent. The paradox is that we are the most clear and precise when dealing with abstract issues. This is because when we become fully developed we are able to relate a physical inner intent to an abstract, outer, Universal Intent. As we become more evolved, we develop a strategic sensibility that is both fabricating, i.e., creative and visionary and calculating. 

We are also called Implementers, because we reflect both the impulses of our physical body and how our creative spirit interacts with that body. For many individuals, it is hard to imagine how we can be both grounded and high-minded. One way this is seen and valued is our increased sense of integrity and an appreciation for loyalty. Some are also surprised to learn that we are highly discriminating when dealing with extremely abstract ideas. This is because, although we like and seek accuracy, we also love economy in motion, where we can be ambiguous about the results. When grounded and high-minded connections are opened up, we become completely clear and single-minded in our pursuit of proven, safe solutions. Most individuals see our sense of determination as self-limiting, when we are not flexible. 

Another side of our process is in the pursuit of answers. Compared to all the other Creative Expressions, we are the most flexible Intelligence in creating answers. As long as the solution is effective, the particular process does not matter to us. The only limit to our flexibility is our struggle to make sure that a process maintains the standard or quality that we have come to expect. We are known for our ability to systematically search through different alternatives and quickly eliminate those that do not hold promise. The irony is that while we pay attention to the details, we also tend to disregard them, when they do not seem to have necessary relevance. We can simultaneously explore options, analyze them, and quantify each option’s merits independently. 

Our kind of matrix thinking is called concatenation, which allows us to analyze data at the same time we are developing preliminary conclusions. Concatenation is the ability to analyze results based on incremental changes in variables or input. We optimize the end result based on knowing exactly what is needed, when it is needed. We are highly deductive and skilled at identifying likely problems in any process. We are incessantly active, manipulative (in an analytical way), and quantifying, so choices can be made that are backed up by scientific assessments. It is important to note that we can be scientific, but we feel that the science can be overdone and, therefore, we prefer simple solutions. 

We think everything should be considered strategically and tactically. While we are resourceful and can be very convergent, i.e., breaking each problem down into its essential elements and processing one element at a time, we are given to rigorous reasoning and an infinite array of distinctions. We combat the shear magnitude of Thoughts we work with by systematically organizing them in prioritized hierarchies that represent our willingness to deal with them. We use reason to build practical structures that guide how and what to think and our development. This is the opposite of the Inventive Intelligence. The common sense of Intentional Intelligence prescribes us to simplifying whenever possible. Remember, we weave together many types of understanding and usually integrate this information from a multitude of sources; we represent our knowing as Sensations in our physical bodies. We can also amplify our Intelligence, when we do not investigate our options fully. Others typically see us as difficult, but brilliant, eclectic, and penetrating in our analyses. Over time we develop both tactical and strategic perceptions, which, given the proper circumstances, can be acted on immediately.

We are challenged by Subjectification and/or Idealization and we are not worried about Objectification, because we feel more resourceful in this area. Usually we overdo our Sensations at the cost of Feelings, but we are also intellectually self-reflective in terms of our Thoughts. What is ironic is that we rarely consider higher forms of knowing but commonly apply these forms to come up with unique and body-intuitive ways of solving problems. This is because we operate at dual levels simultaneously while concentrating on complicated subjects with many variables. We also work well in brainstorming non-linear abstract problem solving tasks. 

Another paradox about our Expression is that, while we have great mental agility, we often get over identified with our physical plane development and become repulsed by how others limit us (and our Intelligence) only to physical activities. This highlights why the theme of our Intentional Intelligence is, “Purpose itself am I.” We do Subjectification, if we become impatient with someone. We can get mentally hyperactive, which is why it is good to have regular physical activity to ground ourselves. We are extremely sensitive to sound and rhythm. 

We tend to focus on our Sensations and activity as the primary way to express our Intelligence. Everything therefore becomes how to fit into the structure of what we seek to accomplish. Any individual who discounts our effort or denies the value of hard work and does not respect the tactics or strategy of excellence in action had better stay away from us, for we have little tolerance for them. We tend to trust only people who are consistent in their word and who are simple in their needs. Anyone who is too complicated or demanding emotionally is moved to the back of the line. We also do not trust individuals who are overly adaptive, seductive or chameleon-like (Inventive Intelligence).

We react to those who have no sense of virtue or loyalty (in our way). While we admire passion, we do not equate emotional sentimentality with positive expression. We are particularly concerned about others with extreme anxiety, worry or excessive moodiness. It is a warning to us when others exaggerate who they are or are overeager for compromise. We believe any unregulated passion (such as indolence, unreliability, procrastination or self-absorption in suffering) is a character flaw. While it may be a complementary self perspective, we do not like excessive objectivity or unrelenting rationalism without it being based upon some kind of sensory input. Anyone who is hyper-idealistic or in any way impractical in the pursuit of their goals will find it difficult to easily connect with us. We have particular difficulty with anyone who acts like a martyr when they are not willing to let things occur that would minimize their martyrdom.

We tend to idealize the strength of our bodies believing that our robust appearance will intimidate others. In any physical activity we expect others to defer to us not just because we are physically strong but we are the most effective both tactically and strategically in getting things done. This physical self confidence is also based on our ability to get our needs met. In relationships this shows up as others appreciating our strength and commitment to full, uncensored animalistic expression. The problem with this is that others can sometimes get tired and exhausted and wonder if our fixation on our physical form has become an expression of our materialistic and selfish self expression. This is because we may use our physical expression to distract others from meeting us in a spiritual way. What our partners might seek is a greater appreciation for our intellectual, emotional and intuitive sensibilities.

As parents, we are very protective and observant of our children. Most would say we are overprotective, particularly in situations where there seems to be little danger. What we are most afraid of is some danger that we cannot predict or plan for. This is why we like to have emergency supplies for any contingency. We also like our children to be physically capable of protecting themselves, which is why we encourage martial arts training, sports, or other team events. What we most seek is to create safety in the home so that our children are confident and capable of taking care of themselves. We also tend to teach our children to be careful of strangers and to have ways to contact us should anything unusual arise. While we are extremely good at protecting our children on a physical level, we are less successful at protecting them from social, emotional, or intellectual attacks. We are the first one to attempt to minimize the effect of these disturbances by teaching our children to be stoic, and we will do anything to prevent these attacks long-term, if possible. This includes speaking with other parents and equipping our children with cell phones or other emergency deterrents such as pepper spray. The key issue is that we do not want our children to become victims because we do not want feel like a failure in protecting them.

When we operate from this Mental Body we are very protective and observant of our children. We commonly seek to keep our child close to us on a body level and also sense psychically when there is some threat to the child’s well-being. Most would say we are overprotective, particularly in situations where there seems to be little danger. What we are most afraid of is some danger that we cannot predict or plan for. This is why we like to have emergency supplies for any contingency. We also like our children to be physically capable of protecting themselves, which is why we encourage martial arts training, sports, or other team events. What we most seek is to create safety in the home so our children are confident and capable of taking care of themselves. To this end, we create structures and rules for them to follow. We teach the value of organization so the family can function efficiently with minimal drama. What torments us is out of control, loud children. This means our children’s friends can sometimes test our patience by their lack of understanding and common sense of what is expected of them.

We also tend to teach our children to be careful of strangers and to have ways to contact us should anything unusual arise. While we are extremely good at protecting our children on a physical level, we are less successful at protecting them from social, emotional, or intellectual attacks.  Our common response is to suck it up and ignore these provocations because they come from weak-willed individuals. We unconsciously communicate that emotional outbursts and emotional manipulation are for those who can’t perform in life. We therefore encourage our children to persevere and be winners by developing their power. What irritates us the most are whiners and complainers or even worse, victims. We are the first to attempt to minimize the effect of these disturbances by teaching our children to be stoic, and we will do anything to prevent problems long-term, if possible. This includes speaking with other parents and equipping our children with cell phones or other emergency deterrents such as pepper spray. The key issue is that we do not want our children to be at the effect of circumstances beyond their capacity.

This Mental Body encourages consistency, timeliness, and productivity. Children are expected to keep themselves busy by doing chores, homework, or sports. A child is encouraged to develop mastery over any topic or activity they perform. Laziness, indifference or a lack of commitment are abhorred. Children are expected to keep their rooms clean and organized. Every child is expected to play their part in keeping the house and yard tidy and functional, particularly for unexpected guests. Parents with this style usually come up with scheduling boards so everyone can identify where a child is and where a child needs to go at any time of day, or night. It is also common for children to be given incentives for performance in all of their activities. This Implementer Mental Body parents work best with Implementer, Orchestrator and Investigator children. It works in sporadic ways for Visionary, Storyteller and Compassionate children. It usually does not work at all for Inventor children who have great difficulties with the consistency, and structure expected of them.

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© Copyright 2016, Larry Byram. All Rights Reserved.

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